Archive

  • Sales of jewelry at dedicated jewelry stores in the U.S. fell by nearly 5% (-4.6%) to $14.4 billion from $15.1 billion in the first half of 2019, according to figures from the US Census Bureau (see link). In June, the decline was the sharpest of the year, falling 10.5% to $2.31 billion from $2.58 billion in the same month a year ago. This would indicate a downturn in consumer confidence, although provisional figures from July show a 1.3% increase July 2018, at $2.41 billion.

  • From October 22-24, 2019, the Antwerp World Diamond Centre (AWDC) will be hosting the 15th edition of the "Antwerp Diamond Experience", where it will welcome select jewelers, wholesalers and manufacturers from across Europe and give them inside access to the world's leading diamond trade center … free of charge, and with no purchase obligation. (Registration link below).

  • Signet Jewelers' sales for the second quarter of fiscal 2020 (ended Aug. 3) fell but did not decline as much as expected, and investors took notice. The company's stock, declining hard and fast since 2015 - and down over 60% year-to-date in 2019 - jumped by roughly 25% on the news and have held its gains. The world’s largest jewelry retailer announced reported that total sales fell 3.9% to $1.34 billion in Q2 and that comps for same-store-sales fell 1.5%, outpacing the forecasted 2–3% drop.

  • Tiffany & Co. earlier this month announced plans to enter the India market, and recently said they would be increasing their presence in China following a quarter in which they saw double-digit growth with local customers in Mainland China, together with a decline in tourist purchases which impacted their Q2 results.

  • Tiffany & Co. reported a decline in sales in the Americas and globally in the second quarter, with the company pointing to weak spending among tourists and locals in the Americas and Asia Pacific spurred by unrest in Hong Kong. Net sales in the second quarter tailed off by 3% to $1.05 billion in the three months ended July 31, in part due to a strong performance in the same quarter a year ago when they earned $1.08 billion. Worldwide same-stores sales were down 4 percent, the jeweler announced, while net income of $136.3m in the second quarter was down 6% from a year ago.

  • Signet Jewelers Limited claims to be the world's largest retailer of diamond jewelry and is clearly the largest specialty retail jeweler in the US, UK and Canada. It operates over 3,300 stores primarily under the name brands of Kay Jewelers, Zales, Jared The Galleria Of Jewelry, H.Samuel, Ernest Jones, Peoples, Piercing Pagoda, and JamesAllen.com. Just over a year ago the company was among the S&P 500, but its share price and market cap have fallen hard.

  • Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group (CTF) has reported higher sales and continuing expansion of their POS (points of sale) during Q1 FY 2020 (three months ended 30 June 2019), as sales in mainland China stores continued to grow at a strong rate while those in Hong Kong and Macau declined for the second time in the past three quarters. Retail sales grew by 24% in mainland China during the period, with same-store sales (SSS) improving by 11%, the jeweler reported. Retail revenues in Hong Kong and Macau fell by 6%, while SSS dropped further, down 11%.

  • Russian diamond-mining giant Alrosa increased its rough-diamond output in Q2 and H1 2019, but the miner's sales have fallen to a low not seen since Alrosa started publishing monthly results in 2016 as rough and polished diamond market saw weak activity and very poor demand. Alrosa pointed to changing retail practices such as consolidation and increasing online sales as reasons for a reduction in polished diamond stocks across the retail sector. As businesses embrace more efficient stock management practices, cutters and polishers reduce the volumes of their rough diamond purchases. 

  • Australian jewelry chain Michael Hill says it underpaid staff by as much as A$25 million (US$17.45 million) over the past six years, and will pay out a sum in the range of A$10-25 million (US$7-17.5 million) to redress its error. The Brisbane-based chain is the latest in a string of organisations to admit to staff underpayments, and will face questions from the Fair Work Ombudsman (FWO), writes the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). The jeweler discovered the discrepancy on its own but did not inform the FWO about it.

  • The withdrawal of India’s beneficiary status under the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) trade program is expected to have a "moderate" impact on India's exports of gems and jewelry to the US, but will not directly impact diamond exports - contrary to what some have been reporting.

  • Christie's Maharajas & Mughal Magnificence collection earned a total of $109,271,875 in New York, representing the highest amount taken in by any auction of Indian art and Mughal objects, and the second highest for a private jewelry collection - falling just short of the 2011 auction of Elizabeth Taylor’s jewelry, good for a nearly $116 million haul. Almost 400 lots were offered, ranging from legendary Golconda diamonds to dazzling coloured stones, jeweled objects used in the royal courts to swords and daggers once owned by Indian rulers.

  • Christie's will hold the landmark Maharajas & Mughal Magnificence sale this week Wednesday (June 19) in New York, and it is slated to be perhaps the highest earning jewelry sale in the auction house's history.

  • Hong Kong based jewelry retail and bellwether for the Chinese market Chow Tai Fook Group (CTF) has announced that its sales grew 13% to $8.5 billion (HK$66,661 million) for the year ending March 31 (FY2019), citing increased purchases of gold jewelry and an expansion of the company’s retail network in China. Retail sales in Mainland China rose by 8% to $3.88 billion, while revenue from Hong Kong and Macau increased 12% to $2.94 billion.

  • Signet Jewelers reported a decline in revenue during the first quarter of fiscal 2020 (ended May 4), as sales fell at all their banner stores except for Piercing Pagoda - the ear piercing and gold and sterling silver shop with roughly 780 kiosks in shopping malls across the United States and Puerto Rico - which gained 13.5%. Ecommerce sales also increased 5.3% year over year to $154.3 million.

  • Swarovski, famous for its glass and zirconia crystals and recognized as one of the world's leading jewelry and accessory brands, has announced its plans to enter into the diamond jewelry category. Avi Krawitz of Rapaport News gathered the scoop from Nadja Swarovski, head of corporate communications and design services, who made the announcement during a panel discussion at JCK Las Vegas last week.

  • Leading jewelry industry magazine JCK held two jewelry design competitions at this year's Las Vegas show: the annual Luxury Design Awards and JCK Design Center Editor’s Choice Awards (click "Read the full article" to see the designs).

  • Tiffany & Co. reported a modest decline in global sales in the first quarter, impacted by unfavorable foreign exchange rates and 'dramatically' lower worldlwide tourist spending, which was mitigated by strong local sales. The famous jeweler announced that in the first quarter, worldwide net sales declined 3% to $1.0 billion, down from $1.03 billion in Q1 2018, and comparable sales declined 5%; on a constant-exchange-rate basis, however, net sales were equal to the prior year and comparable sales declined 2%.

  • Is the goal of Lightbox to lower the price of lab-growns?

  • Sir Gabriel Tolkowsky is one of the greatest diamond cutters of all time. His many accomplishments include the fashioning of the priceless, 273.85-carat Centenary Diamond, cut from a 599.19-carat rough stone, which is still the largest D Flawless diamond in history, and the Golden Jubilee Diamond, the largest faceted diamond in the world at 546 carats. Sir Tolkowsky - known as Gabi - is also renowned for creating the “Flower Cuts” for De Beers, which accentuate the brilliance of typically lower-quality and lower-color stones with their unconventional angles and facets. 

  • Luxury group Richemont, owner of the Cartier and Van Cleef & Arpels jewelry brands, recorded a 10% rise in jewelry and watch sales for the year ended 31 March 2019. Jewelry sales saw progression in all regions and in all channels, with double digit increases in Asia Pacific - particularly in China - and the Americas, while watch sales increased in most regions with double-digit growth in retail, reflecting strong client demand. Jewelry and watches represent Richemont's two largest product lines at 36% and 35% of group sales, respectively.

  • The list of Chinese products to be hit by 25 percent tariffs imposed by the U.S. government at the behest of President Donald Trump is expansive and is potentially about to cover the entirety of consumer products from China, including a broad swath of jewelry products, as the trade war escalates rapidly. On May 9, the U.S.

  • The Antwerp World Diamond Centre (AWDC), the coordinating federation for the Antwerp diamond industry, is joining forces with Ars Nobilis, the umbrella organization for the Belgian jewelry sector, in an effort to streamline the Antwerp diamond trade with jewelry manufacturers and retailers in Belgium. The two representative bodies yesterday signed a memorandum of understanding stating that the members of Ars Nobilis will be able to call upon the services of the AWDC regarding legal advice, training, public relations and communication, advocacy and security.

  • Leading Hong Kong jeweler Chow Tai Fook is expanding in North America, this week announcing the establishment of a "business hub" in Boston to supply products and services - jewelry and technology - on a wholesale basis to US retailers. Chow Tai Fook North America (CTFNA) says it "will offer customized, specialty collections in the diamond and fine jewelry segments, as well as private label offerings, to address the evolving needs of jewelry consumers." CTFNA, which owns diamond jewelry brands Hearts on Fire and Mémoire, recently moved Hearts On Fire President Caryl Capeci into the role of

  • Jewelry maker Pandora, known for its charm bracelets, intends to make another 1,200 workers in Thailand redundant while speeding up its marketing spend as its new CEO looks to turn around the struggling jewelry maker after another disappointing quarter. The company already laid off 700 of their nearly 14,000 employees in Thailand, which is almost half of its 32,000 global workforce.

  • Global demand for gold jewelry rose 1% in Q1 2019 to 530.3 tonnes, driven by the Indian market, writes World Gold Council (WGC). A lower local rupee gold price in late February and early March coincided with the wedding season, which is the traditional time for significant gold purchases, lifting jewelry demand in India 5% higher than the same period last year. The 125.4 tonnes purchased makes last Q1 2019 the highest Q1 since 2015. 

  • A spectacular and comprehensive trove of nearly 400 diamonds, colored stones and the finest jeweled objects from the Mughal Empire (1526-1857) to the present day, with provenance including the royal and noble families of India, will be offered in a landmark auction this June at Christie's in New York. Christie’s anticipates the Maharajas & Mughal Magnificence jewelry auction could rank as one of its most high-profile and high-value jewelry auctions ever, featuring some incredible dia

  • The Shirley Temple blue diamond caught everyone's attention exactly three years ago when it hit the auction block at Sotheby's New York with an estimated price between $25 million and $35 million. The highest bid was $22 million, which was below the ring's reserve price and it failed to sell.

  • De Beers Group announced last week that Nancy Liu will become the new Forevermark CEO, stepping up from her current role as COO and taking over the day to day responsibility for the leading diamond brand. Stephen Lussier, Executive Vice-President of Consumer & Brands for De Beers Group, will continue to oversee the strategic role Forevermark plays within the Group’s brand portfolio as Forevermark Chairman. Lussier has been the brand’s CEO since 2009.

  • Earlier this year in a cost-cutting move, Signet Jewelers, which claims to be "the world's largest retailer of diamond jewelry," asked its employees in Akron, Ohio and Dallas, Texas to apply for a "Voluntary Transition Program" out of the company. “Based on participation," the company wrote, "we may need to take additional actions including an involuntary reduction-in-force.” The message wasclear enough: take the buyout or risk being fired without one. Not enough people took the severance package and assistance in finding a new job voluntarily, and the firings have arrived.

  • Tiffany & Co has been expanding its workforce in sub-Saharan Africa as part of its drive to increase its transparency and raise ethical jewelry standards across the industry.

  • A twin-stone colored diamond ring featuring fancy vivid blue pear-modifiedbrilliant-cut diamonds of 3.06 and 2.61 carats was the headline item at Christie’s New York Magnificent Jewels auction on 16 April, selling for $6.7 million, or $1.2 million per carat. The hammer price fell right within its $6-$8 million pre-sale estimate. 

  • Several diamond and jewelry industry sites are reporting that the U.S. State Department may be prepraring to strengthen and enforce disclosure requirements for all materials used in jewelry. State Department representaitives met with a coalition of industry leaders in New York to explain the new potential regulations. According to Rob Bates at JCK, "The United States believes that jewelry materials and other minerals are funding conflict and rogue regimes, specifically mentioning Iran, Venezuela, and certain countries in Africa, said attendees.

  • The Watches & Jewelry business group of LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton recorded revenue growth in the first quarter of 2019, driven by the performance of its jewelry, though the group lagged behind other product categories. Bvlgari is said to have "made strong progress" in its own stores.

  • Signet Jewelers, North America's largest retail chain for diamond jewelry, endured an uninspiring fourth quarter as weak holiday sales weighed down revenues, sending the jewelry group to a combined 6% loss in Q4 and a 0.1% loss on Fiscal Year 2019. Signet's total Q4 sales (in the 13 weeks ended February 2, 2019) were $2.15 billion, down $138.4 million or 6.0% on a reported basis and 5.4% on a constant currency basis.

  • The Antwerp World Diamond Centre (AWDC), the umbrella organization of the Antwerp diamond industry, participated from 24 to 28 March in the Belgian State Visit to South Korea, where they co-organized an event to highlight a new partnership between Antwerp and Korea's leading jewelery brand, Golden dew. During the State Visit, and in honor of the jeweler's 30th anniversary, Golden dew launched three special cuts it developed together with three different Antwerp diamond companies.

  • Global diamond jewelry sales grew 4% over last year to $85.9 billion in 2018, driven by persistently high demand in the first half of the year, according to Alrosa's global luxury and jewelry market research. The global jewelry market grew at a slightly slower pace than the 5% growth achieved in 2017, a softening the miner attributes to a slowdown in key consumption markets in the second half of 2018.

  • Coronet, the signature brand of Hong Kong-based Aaron Shum Jewelry, has been awarded its ninth Guinness World Record, this time for the most diamonds set on a watch: 15,858, weighing a combined 50.01 carats. Unveiled at BaselWorld last week, the watch is named Mudan 牡丹, which is Chinese for peony, a flower recognized as the King of the flowers in the Chinese culture.

  • Tiffany & Co. last week reported record sales and net earnings for the full year 2018 despite its holiday sales failing to meet expectations due to external events, economic uncertainties, and market volatilities. Worldwide net sales rose by 7%, reaching a record $4.4 billion due to growth in all regions and higher spending attributed to local customers and foreign tourists. Net earnings were $586 million, compared with $370 million in the prior year, notwithstanding a 1% worldwide net sales decline to $1.3 billion.

  • Pandora's Chairman of the Board Peder Tuborgh has told the company to start looking for someone to take over his position in 2019, as he plans to end his nearly five year tenure as the Danish jewerly maker's chair. "Once our new CEO, Alexander Lacik, has been onboarded and we start to see traction from [the new marketing and merchandising strategy] Programme NOW, the foundation for a successful brand turnaround will be in place. it will be time for me to hand over the baton to a new chairman,” Tuborgh said.

  • Searching for a means to safeguard smooth transactions in the event it ends up having US sanctions imposed on it, Russia's Alrosa, the world’s largest producer of rough diamonds, has found a partner in its efforts to conduct trade in a currency other than the US dollar. Evgeny Agureev, Alrosa’s director of sales, told the South China Morning Post that it has enlisted one of its many Chinese customers - Chow Sang Sang Jewellery - on a long-term contract this year.