Archive

  • The JCK show in Las Vegas serves as the ideal platform for the International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR), part of the De Beers Group of Companies, to unveil SYNTHdetect, the first synthetic screening device in the industry to test multiple stones in set jewelry at once. The screener is able to do so without the need for a probe and has the industry’s lowest referral rate at around 0.05%.
     

  • In April 2017, a symposium called, “Synthetic Diamonds: Are Watchmaking and Jewelry in Danger?” was held in Geneva, specifically to address the issue of synthetic diamonds in the domain of watchmaking and how it is possible to differentiate natural from lab-grown stones.

  • Diamond industry analyst and author of the Zimnisky Global Rough Diamond Price Index, Paul Zimnisky, takes us on, "A Trip Through the Diamond Industry in March 2017." If there is one trip you make this weekend, we recommend this one.

  • "The ethical aspect of trading does not weigh more heavily now than in the past. It remains as critical as it has always been. Indeed, we may be confronted with a more inquisitive public than in the past, but our focus on ethics has never changed. People who intentionally misrepresent their product are criminals and must be treated as such. Diamonds must continue to be traded, as in the past, responsibly and ethically.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) on December 5 published the following press release: Following a five-month pilot program which started in June 2016, clients are now able to submit round D-to-Z melee-size diamonds through their fully automated GIA Melee Analysis Service.

  • In his latest article, JCK news director Rob Bates looks at the impact of GIA reporting the discovery of the biggest ever undisclosed CVD synthetic diamond at its Hong Kong lab. Bates argues that even though most cases of undisclosed synthetic diamonds occur in India and China, this latest discovery demonstrates synthetics pose a real and present threat to the entire industry, including the retail segment.

  • New Diamond Technology (NDT) has produced a blue diamond that it says is the world’s largest lab-grown blue diamond – and more than twice the size of its previous large blue stone, reports Rob Bates in JCK Online. The SI, Asscher cut stone weighs 10.07 carats and has a fancy deep blue color. NDT's largest blue diamond had been a 5.03-carat stone.

  • The International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR), part of the De Beers group, announced that it will unveil the latest addition to its suite of synthetic detection technology at the forthcoming Hong Kong Jewellery & Gem Fair between September 14 and 18. The new instrument, PhosView™, is a compact, self-contained screening device designed to allow parcels of polished stones to be quickly and accurately analyzed to determine if they contain potential High Pressure High Temperature (HPHT) synthetics.

  • On June 16, Amazon launched a new diamond jewelry Collection, selling jewelry set with both natural and lab-grown diamonds manufactured by a joint venture between Dutch startup House of Eleonore and Royal Asscher.

  • Media Release: The De Beers Group of Companies today announced that its Auction Sales business will launch a limited scope service pilot offering diamond businesses the opportunity to sell certain types of rough diamonds on its online auction platform. The service will only be available to those diamond businesses that adhere to the De Beers Auction Sales Rough Diamond Trading Standard.

  • The increasingly ugly 'debate' between the synthetic and natural mined diamond industries is the subject of a commentary by JCK's Rob Bates. He mentions comments by Martin Roscheisen, the CEO of synthetic manufacturer Diamond Foundry, claiming that the mining industry “enslaves people.” And in another interview, when asked about the unemployment that synthetics might spark in African countries, Roscheisen compared that to releasing drug dealers.

  • The GIA has developed a fully automated system which it says can rapidly and accurately analyze and sort round D-to-Z melee-size diamonds. The system was developed in response to concerns in the gem and jewelry industry about the possibility of synthetic or treated diamonds being mixed into parcels of melee. The pilot for the GIA's Melee Analysis Service will be carried out next month at GIA’s laboratory in New York. The service will be offered at all GIA locations, with the roll out beginning in the third quarter of this year.

  • The International Grown Diamond Association (IGDA), an industry-wide association formed by diamond growers, lab-grown diamond distributors, suppliers, retailers and technical experts, has accepted eight new members since its launch in February. Numined Diamonds, Fair Trade Jewellery Co., The Gold Concept Jewelry and Design, Caraxy, M. Geller, Schubach Enterprises, D.NEA and DM Gems India are now IGDA members. The IGDA was founded by more than 10 leading lab-grown diamond producers, distributors, retailers and technical experts.

  • HRD Antwerp Hong Kong has opened its new office in Kowloon, sharing the same premises as the Hong Kong Indian Diamond Association (HKIDA).

  • If consumers lose confidence in diamonds, sales of both natural and synthetic stones will be badly hit, warns Sanjay Kothari, spokesperson for India's Natural Diamond Monitoring Committee (NDMC), Rough & Polished reports. The web site said the recent scandal of CVD diamonds being sold with GIA certificates involving an Indian firm on Chinese online retail giant Alibaba could be "a wakeup call" for the Indian diamond industry.

  • US-based diamond grower Scio Diamond Technology Corp. said it has returned to full production following its December shutdown due to what it called a water line break.

  • The GIA is to start using a screening machine for detecting lab-grown diamonds in batches of melee in the next few months, JCK reports. It will not be offered to the trade, however, unlike the melee-screening device that De Beers has developed. The automated device can screen synthetics and treated diamonds from batches of D-to-Z round melee-size stones. It can also sort melee by size and color. The cost of the service will be size-dependent but will likely start at about 10 cents per stone.

  • The GIA reports that rapid progress in the last few years in High-Pressure, High-Temperature (HPHT) technology is now being used to produce melee-size diamonds around 2–3 mm in diameter and large colorless single crystals all with significantly improved quality and growth rate. A Russian company is reportedly growing multiple large, gem-quality colorless diamond crystals in a single run, while the GIA reports on large diamond crystals manufactured using a similar technology by Jinan Zhongwu New Materials Co. Ltd in Shandong, China.

  • A major article in India's Economic Times describes the developing battle lines between natural, mined diamonds and their lab-grown counterparts. The Bharat Diamond Bourse (BDB) in Mumbai, home to around 2,500 diamond companies and one of the world's largest exchanges, decided last September to act against traders and manufacturers who dealt in lab-grown diamonds. The outlawed trading in lab-grown stones due to increasing instances of such diamonds being added into parcels of natural mined goods.

  • Starting out with a discussion of the Elizabeth Taylor-Richard Burton love affair and reports that she sometimes wore replicas of the famous diamonds that she was given, diamond broker Mark Boston writes in GemKonnect that he could not imagine her doing so. He then attacks moissanite maker Charles & Colvard for being "cynically and calculatingly opportunistic" and "setting a new low in marketing" in presenting a product that is simply a copy of the real thing and then claiming that it is an "ethical" alternative to natural diamonds.

  • The International Grown Diamond Association (IGDA) was launched last month, and industry analyst Chaim Even-Zohar quickly revealed flaws in its structure as well as major transgressions against accepted nomenclature, according to a blog on GemKonnect. In addition, the IGDA doesn’t seem to have done anything about the hugely important issue of the undisclosed mixing of lab-grown diamonds with parcels of natural stones. And the recently revealed scandal of CVD-created diamonds being sold with GIA grading reports has done little to calm nerves.

  • "We received some hostile comments to our story about Stuller selling lab-grown diamonds. This puzzles me. First, Stuller already sells moissanite and other lab-created gems; this was a logical and not out-of-character move for it. And while I understand why some in the industry fear lab-grown diamonds, they are a legitimate, legal product (provided they are sold legitimately and legally), which are not going away.

  • JCK reports US based jewelry manufacturer Stuller has started selling loose lab-grown diamonds, in a strategy to offer customers another, lower-priced option compared to natural diamonds. According to the report Stuller keeps natural and synthetic diamonds in completely separate circuits. The jewelry manufacturer sees no harm in selling both natural and lab-grown diamonds; "The technology is here. It won’t go away.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has graded the largest polished blue synthetic diamond that the organization has ever examined. The emerald-cut, 5.03-carat HPHT Type-IIB stone was made by New Diamond Technology (NDT), based in St. Petersburg, Russia. The firm is one of the founding members of the International Grown Diamond Association which was launched earlier this month. The stone was inspected at the GIA's New York lab last month and received a fancy deep blue grade, according to a lab. The GIA published an exhaustive article on the stone's characteristics.

  • World Diamond Mark Foundation Chairman and CEO Alex Popov says the recent decision of actor Leonardo DiCaprio and other celebrities to invest in the synthetic diamond manufacturer Diamond Foundry is justified in some respects in an article published by GemKonnect, praising it as "an excellent PR and self-promotion decision and I salute their agents’ sophistication and vision." He said the response of the natural diamond industry was "defensive at best and hysterical at worst, although JCK's Rob Bates wrote an excellent open letter which was logical and raised important issues.

  • In this exclusive article, World Federation of Diamond Bourses (WFDB) President Ernie Blom responds to the story Chaim Even-Zohar, editor of Diamond Intelligence Briefs, published last week about a company offering CVD lab grown (synthetic) diamonds inscribed with the numbers of genuine GIA natural diamond grading certificates on Alibaba, a leading online global wholesale trading platform.

  • "The Government of India should set up a regulatory authority to monitor the gemological laboratory business in India. The gemological laboratories issue only grading reports and no certificates. These laboratories have their own set of rules and regulations and even if consumers are cheated they have limited or no role to play. If a consumer has purchased a lab-grown diamond on natural diamond grading report, where will he go on being cheated? Who is responsible?

  • By Chaim Even-Zohar. Reprinted from Diamond Intelligence Briefs by special arrangement.

  • The natural diamond trade should welcome the establishment of the International Grown Diamond Association (IGDA) announced last week even though it may actually serve as a wake-up call for the industry, writes Rapaport's Avi Krawitz. The new body could provide a formal channel of communication in the synthetic – or lab-grown – industry, particularly over the threat of undisclosed synthetics being mixed into parcels of natural diamonds.

  • International Diamond Manufacturers Association (IDMA) President Maxim Shkadov tells GemKonnect that rather than seeing 2015 as an 'annus horribilis' as recently declared in a commentary on its site, it was a actually "an anno veritatis, a Year of the Truth. Indeed, never before have the deficiencies of the diamond supply pipeline been laid bare so clearly, and yes, so painfully." Shkadov scathingly comments that " neither analysts, nor the overwhelming majority of management of the diamond producers had an inkling about what it takes to be a diamond manufacture."

  • Richard S. Garard, the secretary general of the International Grown Diamond Association, an umbrella organization for the lab-grown diamond industry launched earlier this month, answers questions from JCK's Rob Bates on the goals of the group. Among the issues are "properly representing the grown diamond industry, being clear about the properties, the material itself, and to help grow the industry". He said lab-grown diamonds are an "add-on market for the industry. For the foreseeable future, we are a small portion of diamond output.

  • More than 10 leading grown diamond producers, distributors and retailers have come together to launch the International Grown Diamond Association (IGDA). The association aims to represent the grown diamond industry, promote grown diamonds as a new choice in diamonds and educate about various unique qualities and applications of grown diamonds. Founded in the U.S., the IGDA seeks to serve as the central point of communication, education, development and growth of the industry.

  • In a Gemkonneckt blogpost, industry veteran Mark Boston enunciates how lab-grown producers such as The Diamond Foundry seem to be using unsubstantiated anti-natural diamond industry rhetorics as a marketing strategy.

  • In a recently released report, diamond industry financier ABN-AMRO takes stock of the global diamond industry and concludes two crucial forces in a changed industry landscape will determine the future of the industry; increased price competition and the potential impact of synthetics.

  • Despite difficulties the global industry is facing and is likely to continue to see this year, "renewed confidence and an optimistic outlook" is necessary, World Federation of Diamond Bourses President Ernie Blom writes in a commentary in GemKonnect. "We all know that the issues that confronted the industry last year are not going to disappear just because a new year has started, but we must also realize that financial and economic challenges are temporary and it is imperative to retain a balanced outlook.

  • De Beers' Element Six Technologies Ltd subsidiary has today (Tuesday) begun legal action in Singapore against IIa Technologies Pte. Ltd alleging infringement of its patents concerning synthetic diamond material. Element Six believes that certain of its patents for proprietary synthetic diamond products and their method of manufacture have been infringed and the legal action aims to defend its intellectual property rights and business interests, the miner said in a statement. IIa Technologies claims to run the world's largest diamond-growing facility.

  • Gems and Jewellery Export Promotion Council (GJEPC) Chairman Praveenshankar Pandya and Bharat Diamond Bourse (BDB) President Anoop Mehta strongly reiterated at the opening of the Diamond Detection Expo & Symposium in Mumbai that the Indian diamond industry is totally committed to preventing the undisclosed mixing of synthetic diamonds in order to maintain consumer confidence in natural diamonds. Pandya announced that the industry would be forming a Natural Diamond Monitoring Committee (NDMC) in Surat along the lines of the similar body it has set up in Mumbai.

  • Production of lab-grown diamonds will rise to more than 20 million carats annually by 2030 from 3.6 million carats today thereby fulfilling rising demand for diamonds as mined diamond output slumps to just 62 million carats in 2030 from around 125 million carats in 2015, according to a study by an Indian body called the PHD Research Bureau of PHD Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The report claims that demand for diamonds will be 221 million carats annually in 15 years time.

  • North Carolina State University researchers have created a new phase of solid carbon, called Q-carbon, which is distinct from the known phases of graphite and diamond. They have also developed a technique for using Q-carbon to make diamond-related structures at room temperature and at ambient atmospheric pressure in air. Phases are distinct forms of the same material. Graphite is one of the solid phases of carbon; diamond is another.

  • HRD Antwerp CEO Peter Macken speaks about the work of the Antwerp lab and the services it offers, as well as some of the issues affecting the diamond industry. Macken states that, "As consumer demand for diamonds is forecasted to grow in the years ahead, undisclosed synthetic diamonds entering the market remains a challenge for traders and consumers alike. It therefore is very important that all lab-grown diamonds can be identified by a professional lab. It is the diamond industry’s responsibility to ensure the consumer is never misled. We at HRD Antwerp take this task to heart."