Archive

  • ‘Conservation’, the first Diamonds Do Good video in the Diamond Empowerment Fund (D.E.F)’s new Real Stories, Real Diamonds, Real Impact campaign targeting Millennials, has apparently hit its mark. The one-minute video earned 11 million impressions in the first month alone, including 7 million views of at least :30 seconds, and 5 million views of the entire video.

  • 53 million Americans plan to buy a diamond between Thanksgiving and Valentine’s Day. 21% (1-in-5) Americans plan to purchase a diamond between Thanksgiving and Valentine’s Day, with men and millennials among the most likely to be in the market for a diamond this holiday season. 35% of millennials plan to purchase a diamond, and more than 1-in-10 plan to buy a diamond engagement ring (13%), while 27% of men plan to purchase a diamond and 11% plan to buy an engagement ring.

    - Diamond Producers Association, findings from a recent survey.

  • The Millennial and Gen Z generations combined accounted for two-thirds of global diamond jewelry sales in 2017, as diamond jewelry demand reached a new record high of US$82 billion, according to data published today by De Beers Group in its latest Diamond Insight Report.

  • Industry consultant Ben Janowski takes an in-depth look at the developments that led De Beers to enter into the laboratory-grown diamond jewelry sector, and what Lightbox may mean long-term for the mining giant. Published in full courtesy of Ben Janowski, who will be lecturing at the Antwerp Summer University program, "From Mine to Finger 2018: A deep dive into the world of diamonds."* 

  • Forevermark, the diamond brand from De Beers Group, has announced the launch of Libert’aime by Forevermark, a new flagship store at HKRI Taikoo Hui in Shanghai, the Group writes in a press release. The opening marks the 1,000th Forevermark store in China, and comes as the brand celebrates its 10-year anniversary in the country.

  • Signet CEO Virginia 'Gina' Drosos recently spoke with Yahoo Finance about digital marketing and millennials, providing some candid perspectives about the thought process of the retail giant. Perhaps her most ringing comment, however, was about laboratory-grown diamonds.

  • Many laboratory-grown diamond companies describe their diamonds as being green or eco-friendly and use words such as ‘greenhouse’ or ‘foundry’ to try and influence opinion. [Consumers] are also being told that [synthetic] diamonds are real diamonds without the human or environmental impact. This is a misrepresentation. They deceive the consumer, because a synthetic diamond is not worth much at retail value. Millennials are being fed lies, because the gap between reality and marketing is huge.

  • With marriage rates falling and divorce rates climbing, the diamond industry is facing a challenge to win over Chinese millennial consumers, Ruonan Zheng writes for Jing Daily.

  • According to a new report from consultancy Bain & Co., after stalling in 2016, revenues from personal luxury goods are set to rise 6 percent in 2017 to 262 billion euros ($308 billion), thanks to thriving demand from Chinese and Millennial shoppers, writes Reuters. Earlier projections were for a growth rate of 2 to 4 percent, but as Bain opens its summary statement, "Luxury is back in fashion.

  • “People have long bought flashy items because they made them feel good. Now some say those same items make them feel icky,” wrote JCK’s Rob Bates. According to a recent New York Times article a percentage of affluent consumers are moving away from the ‘If you’ve got it, flaunt it’ stereotype. Some even consider their wealth a burden, going as far as hiding the price tag of their recent purchases.

  • Independent analyst and consultant on diamonds and the mining industry, and publisher of the Zimnisky Global Rough Diamond Price Index, Paul Zimnisky has published an in-depth article on the current state of lab-created diamonds and where the industry goes from here. Reprinted from Paul Zimnisky Diamond Analytics, courtesy of Paul Zimnisky.

  • KRC Research conducted an online survey on behalf of the Diamond Producers Association (DPA) regarding US millennial women’s views on luxury goods. The results highlighted three major trends: Long term value both financially and emotionally, Pride in legitimacy of the goods purchased and the expression of self-confidence.

  • Following up on their successful 2015 short film "The Proposal", Cartier has launched two new videos on social media: "The Proposal: Jump Right In" and "The Proposal: My Favorite Song", both of which explicitly target the millennial generation of consumers. 

  • Online coupon search site and retail trend analyst CouponFollow recently released The Millennial Shopping Report, tracking the behavior of those born between 1982 and 1996, who now constitute "the largest generation in human history", with over 80 million members in the U.S. alone. CouponFollow claims that Millennials spend $600 billion annually and are, "poised to inherit $30 trillion from their Baby Boomer parents"; they already account for 28% of all daily per-person consumer spending, and it is suggested that could rise to 35% by 2030.

  • According to the Diamond Empowerment Fund their new millennial oriented campaign ‘Diamonds do Good’ had reached three million consumers within their target group. The strategy to spread the word on the campaign includes a revamped website, a targeted media plan which is shared on Hulu, Pandora and YouTube, and an online influencer strategy. DEF said the message of ‘Diamonds Do Good’ is resonating with consumers.

  • Everlane’s founder, Michael Preysman, who sells classic designs over the internet by promising “radical transparency”, believes he has identified the issues Millennials have regarding provenance and price. He pledges low-cost, high-quality goods made in factories used by designer brands, thus making them more appealing to their consumers. Everlane has a studio in Soho, New York, where shoppers are encouraged to try on the products and then return home and purchase their goods online, an inventive way of combining retail and ecommerce.

  • With 850 million active users monthly, western luxury brands have been quick to embrace China’s “most important platform for luxury brands”, WeChat. Local and international brands have realised the potential of the platform to make them key players in China’s $103 billion jewelry market. Western companies have used it for flash sales as well as marketing and customer interaction. While these flash events have spurred sales, China’s online sales remain limited, says Antoine Pin, managing director of Bulgari in greater China.

  • Fashion and jewelry houses are stunned by the latest shopping trend: See-now, Buy-Now. Consumers nowadays desire instant gratification and no longer wish to wait between seeing an outfit on the runway and being able to purchase the look. This trend is likely due to the increase in women who are buying jewelry and designer clothes for themselves. “They buy jewelry like they buy fashion, so are more spontaneous now,” said Nicolas Bos, chief executive of Van Cleef & Arpels.

  • On Thursday March 9, 2017 Antwerp’s Young Diamantaires hosted their first networking event since the initiative was relaunched. Supported by the Antwerpsche Diamantkring, the Young Diamantaires’ program is designed to provide a platform for the under-40 generation of diamantaires, polishers, jewelry manufacturers and diamond industry professionals working and living in Belgium. The Diamond Loupe sat down with a few committee members from the Young Diamantaires Antwerp (YDA) and asked them about their initiative.

  • Every marketeer has spent countless hours strategizing on how to target millennials, which has led them to neglect an important audience: introducing the Midult. Paula De Luca, creative director of trend forecasting company Trendvision, defines the midult as a women between the ages of 35 and 55 who has spending power – in other words, a Generation X female, born between 1960 and 1980. Following millennials and baby boomers, Gen X is the third largest generation in America, making up 25% of the 60 million adults in the U.S. 

  • When people talk badly about diamonds, they think of the stone they're going to buy, but they don't think of the lives that are going to be affected. In Botswana, for example, 45-50% of the total GDP comes from diamond mining. So when people say, "I'm not going to buy a diamond because it has a bad rep", think of the two-plus million people in Botswana that will be affected.

  • Jewelers around the world have come to realize the mostly untapped potential of the millennial audience, and technology is the most important tool they have at their disposal, writes Martha C. White for JCK.

  • As the Hong Kong Trade Fairs get under way, all eyes are on the Chinese retail market and their largest contingent of diamond consumers – the Millennials. Since 2015 luxury jewelers have noticed a growing demand for diamonds by Chinese millennials, aged 18 to 34, who are altering the perception that diamonds are only a symbol of love to be received when getting engaged, married or for an anniversary.

  • Authentic advertising campaigns are the next Big thing when targeting millennials, who prefer seeing real people facing situations they could identify with. This strategy is quickly gaining popularity with leading brands in their attempt to reach the everyday consumer, who is more laid-back than previous generations. Italian Jeweler Pomellato, celebrating its 50th anniversary, implemented this tactic and linked their campaign with female empowerment, a movement that is being encouraged through various platforms.

  • 77 Diamonds, a small independent London company, has caused quite a stir in the shopping environment for jewelry by making bespoke jewelry in the UK and selling it online. The business was developed to cater to the change in consumer behavior of a generation that is more likely to meet their potential match by swiping right, than in person.

  • 179-year-old Tiffany & Co. has made headlines recently, launching a new ad campaign featuring Lady Gaga - who rocked the Super Bowl halftime show - and quietly dropping CEO Frederic Cumenal.  Cumenal was let go due to his inability to turn around the dropping sales figures since taking over in April 2015.

  • "As consumer expectations lean increasingly toward transparency, a brand’s dedication to sustainable business practices is more important than ever before," write Jen King for Luxury Daily in her report on the “Sustainability is the New Black: Consumers Expect Ethical Transparency” session at Luxury FirstLook: Time for Luxury 2.0 on Jan. 18. She writes, "Panelists from the jewelry, spirits and hospitality sectors discussed how their businesses approach corporate social responsibility.

  • National Jeweler’s Editor-in-chief Michelle Graff made 3 Predictions regarding the retail market for 2017 based on current market trends and the way consumer demand is changing with the times. Retailers, including larger chains, will continue the 2016 trend of closing down. Women’s clothing retailer The Limited announced that they were closing all their stores and operating strictly online.

  • Diamond industry analyst Paul Zimnisky, in his most recent article "A New Diamond Industry", analyzes three significant changes - and the catalysts for those changes - that have been reshaping the diamond industry in recent years: 1) a new operating discipline, 2) a new generation of consumers, and 3) new technology.

  • De Beers CEO Bruce Cleaver sat down with Joseph Pisani of the Associated Press to talk about how the diamond industry is trying to reach millennials, "the under-35-year-olds who may be more focused on paying off student loan debt than buying diamonds and getting hitched." The commercials the Diamond Producers Association launched in 2016 - the financing for which De Beers contributed to as member of the DPA - abandon the conventional view of diamonds purcha

  • In 2015, Chinese millennials - specifically women aged 18 to 34 - accounted for 68% of Chinese diamond sales, worth $6.76 billion last year, according to research by De Beers. Jily Ji, a 27-year unmarried college graduate: “We don’t have to passively wait to be gifted a diamond by a man, diamond jewelry is a natural way to express ourselves. It’s a far better investment than most fashion items as it won’t only gain value, but can also be passed down through the generations.” In their "Diamond Insight Report 2016" De Beers points out that U.S.

  • De Beers newly appointed CEO, Bruce Cleaver, sat down with The New York Times regarding Diamonds and Millennials. In October the DPA, Diamond Producers association, launched their highly anticipated “Real Is Rare” campaign, partly funded by De Beers.

  • The recently published Global Diamond Report 2016 prepared by Bain & Company and AWDC covers industry developments in 2015 and early 2016 and takes a close look at the millennial generation (roughly speaking, people born between 1980 and the early 2000s) as a new category of diamond buyers.

  • Bain & Company together with the Antwerp World Diamond Centre (AWDC) has published their sixth annual report on the global diamond jewelry trade, with the lead insight being that in 2015 - not a banner year by any stretch of the imagination - retail sales grew 3% at constant exchange rates but declined about 2% in US dollar terms due to currency depreciation and slower demand in China. This followed a period of growth from 2012 through 2014, signifying that diamond jewelry consumption has entered "a moderation phase".

  • A 3D printing startup from Hong Kong, called POESIS, has successfully completed its crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter for a smart 3D printing jewelry system which allows anyone to easily create unique and resilient rings and bracelets. A study by YouGov, a prominent data research firm, indicated that marketing efforts by high-end jewelers for Millennials are proving to be inefficient.

  • In her recent article for Bloomberg, "Happy Couples Don't Buy Diamonds Online the Way They Used To," Polly Mosendz analyzes the changing landscape for diamond engagement rings - and in particular the online sales thereof. She notes firstly the trend for diamond rings to change hands online in way they never did previously, resulting in tremendous growth in the second-hand market.

  • What do Millennials want? A question the entire diamond trade has been posing. Millennials are obsessed with the concept of individualism and crafting a unique persona, so why should selecting their engagement ring be any different? Many brides-to-be prefer receiving or even designing a ring that suits their unique personalities. Brilliant Earth, a sustainable jewelry company that offers a create-your-own option, analyzed engagement-ring shopping behavior in the U.S.

  • Helen H. Wang, an award-winning author and expert on China’s middle class, writes for Forbes that Chinese millennials, in addition to their burgeoning numbers (by 2020, Chinese millennials are expected to reach 300 million strong, compared to 80 million in the U.S.) have two distinct advantages over their U.S. counterparts: no student loan debt and no housing expenses. According to China National Administration of Tourism, writes Wang, more than 120 million Chinese traveled abroad in 2015, spending $194 billion.

  • JCK's Emili Vesilind digs into Cassandra's SHOP Report, which its website describes as, "A deep dive into young consumers' habits and attitudes around the future of retail, shopping, and spending," and aims to provide, "a comprehensive portrait of the evolving ways Gen Y (also known as Millennials) and Gen Z are approaching the purchasing process and the dynamic role that brands are playing in the lives of these influential young consumers." Vesilind writes, "Emily Anatole, Cassandra’s associate insights director,

  • The highly anticipated launch of the Diamond Producers Association's "Real is rare. Real is a diamond" category marketing campaign is finally a fait accompli. Two intense ads featuring young couples will air on broadcast television and various digital platforms such as Hulu alongside a social media push. The Diamond Producers Association has also planned a major public relations initiative in its efforts to reintroduce young Americans to the appeal of a real diamond.