Archive

  • A new discovery has the potential to change how we look for diamonds in Canada and around the world, write Katie Willis from the University of Alberta, Canada. This comes as potentially big news to an industry that has discovered scant few significant and economic diamond deposits in the past decade.

  • Hamdi Ali, a 17-year old high-school student from Canada has discovered a new way to extract diamonds from kimberlite rocks, according to a report from the University of Alberta where she was conducting summer research. She discovered that using SELFRAG high voltage pulse power fragmentation technology on the kimberlite rocks enabled recovery of diamonds that would have been crushed if established extraction methods had been used.

  • HRD Antwerp, a leading European authority in diamond certification, recently undertook a study entitled “The Effect of Fluorescence on the Colour of a Diamond”, concluding that even strong fluorescence does not negatively impact a diamond’s appearance. In fact, their findings demonstrate the contrary: under normal conditions and even when outdoors, strong fluorescence has a positive influence on the color of diamonds. This finding directly contradicts the common perception that fluorescence is a negative property of diamonds, driving down their value.

  • There may be more than a quadrillion tons of diamond hidden in the Earth’s interior, according to a new study from MIT and other universities. But the new results are unlikely to set off a diamond rush, writes MIT News. The scientists estimate the precious minerals are buried more than 100 miles below the surface, far deeper than any drilling expedition has ever reached.

  • A research team, led by GIA’s Evan Smith, has made a significant breakthrough in understanding how the biggest and rarest diamonds are born of deep-lying metallic liquid. 

  • HRD Antwerp, Europe’s leading diamond certification authority, has inaugurated its new Mumbai office extension and launched a new melee diamond screening service. At the center of this service is M-Screen, the world's fastest automated melee screening device that screens round brilliant diamonds from 1 point to 20 points for potential lab grown diamonds, potential HPHT colour enhanced diamonds and simulants. The M-Screen automatically feeds, screens and sorts out round brilliant diamonds at a speed of minimum two diamonds per second (7,200 diamonds per hour).

  • Harry Winston has released a new limited edition timepiece, the Countdown to a Cure Timepiece, to benefit amfAR's (The American Foundation for AIDS Research) efforts to develop a cure for HIV/AIDS. The timepiece, which has been exclusively designed for the campaign, is part of Harry Winston’s Midnight Collection.

  • In a contribution on the Fancy Color Research Foundation (FCRF) website, Chief Scientist of the Diamond Durability Laboratory, Daniel Howell brings a widespread misconception to the attention on what many assume to be bubbles of air or gas trapped inside rough diamonds. The misconception has led some manufacturers to drill release channels, fearing the trapped gas may cause the rough diamond to explode during polishing.

  • North Carolina State University researchers have created a new phase of solid carbon, called Q-carbon, which is distinct from the known phases of graphite and diamond. They have also developed a technique for using Q-carbon to make diamond-related structures at room temperature and at ambient atmospheric pressure in air. Phases are distinct forms of the same material. Graphite is one of the solid phases of carbon; diamond is another.

  • Professor David Phillips, Head of the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, recently crushed an eight-carat diamond to extract two rare, emerald-coloured inclusions in an attempt to discover the secrets of its origin and a potential 'mother lode' of diamonds. The inclusions are made of a green mineral called clinopyroxene, which contains small amounts of radioactive potassium. This makes it possible to date when the diamonds erupted out of a volcano, after they were formed inside. Knowing this makes it easier to hunt down the original source.

  • The findings “constitute a new quantitative theory” about how diamonds are formed, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins University in the United States. “Diamond formation in the deep Earth—the very deep Earth—may be a more common process than we thought,” says Johns Hopkins University geochemist Dimitri A. Sverjensky.

  • A team from the University of Sydney has come up with a method that uses nanoscale, synthetic diamonds to detect cancers before they become life threatening. The physicists findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, reveal how to make the tiny gems light up inside a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine, acting as a beacon for early-stage cancers. The manipulated diamonds are then attached to specific chemicals that are known to target cancers.

  • Geochemist Yaakov Weiss from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory describes how inclusions in lower-grade stones provide huge amounts of information about the inaccessible areas deep underground where diamonds are formed and travel through on their way upwards.

    "After a diamond captures something, from that moment until millions of years later in my lab, that material stays the same. We can look at diamonds as time capsules, as messengers from a place we have no other way of seeing," Weiss commented.

  • Microscopic, ugly diamonds from the Northwest Territories are illuminating how diamonds are made. A new study suggests they formed from ancient seawater trapped deep below the surface of the Earth. A group of U.S., U.K. and Canadian scientists think they have good evidence that a key component of the fluid that produced at least some kinds of diamonds was ancient seawater, trapped 200 kilometres beneath the surface of the Earth.

  • A reasearcher from the Biomedical Engineering Department at the University Medical Center of Groningen (Netherlands) has discovered a new technique that could form the basis for new cancer medications. The technique would introduce nano-diamonds into living cancer cells to detect the behavior of free radicals. Free radicals can damage healthy cells and cause cancer, but they only exist for a fraction of a second, making it difficult to identify and study them.

  • Dr. Brad Cann from De Beers Research will speak at the 1st Mediterranean Gemmological and Jewellery Conference scheduled for June 27 in the Greek capital. His paper is entitled, 'Fluorescence imaging of CVD synthetic samples and natural diamonds.'

  • A geologist has discovered a thorny, palmlike plant in Liberia that seems to grow only on top of kimberlite pipes—columns of volcanic rock hundreds of meters across that extend deep into Earth, and could be simple, powerful way of finding diamond-rich deposits. Miners have long known that particular plants can signal ore-bearing rocks, but the new plant, identified as Pandanus candelabrum, is the first indicator species for diamond-bearing kimberlite, says Stephen Haggerty, a researcher at Florida International University in Miami and the chief exploration officer of Youssef Diamon

  • To gemologists, the high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) press speaks of synthetic diamond growth or newfangled methods of diamond color treatment. For Valerie Hillgren, a research scientist at the Carnegie Institution of Washington’s Geophysical Laboratory, the presses that create these conditions are a means to another end: studying how the terrestrial planets of our solar system might have formed.

  • A team of Australian scientists have unveiled a ground-breaking study that identifies, for the first time, the exact source of diamond-bearing rocks known as orangeites. The paper reveals that orangeites —until now believed to be common only to South Africa— may be present in much higher abundance worldwide