Archive

  • In early 2019, the GIA (Gemological Institute of America) prodvided an update on two pilot projects to distribute an illustrated booklet, “Selecting Gem Rough: A Guide for Artisanal Miners,” which was created to help small-scale miners learn more about the quality and classification of the gems they recover, and ultimately to help them obtain greater market value.

  • Researchers at the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) recently identified a natural diamond with a CVD (lab-grown) layer, creating a composite of synthetically grown and natural diamond that added weight and improved the color. Given that this was the second discovery of such a composite, the fist coming in 2017, warning that "this could be a new type of product entering the market."

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) is enhancing its ‘Know Your Customer’ (KYC) program. As of May 1, the GIA will require all new and current laboratory clients to confirm the identity and ownership of their businesses, and to provide identifying information for all authorized representatives conducting business with GIA on their behalf. "These requirements are recognized globally and are not unique to GIA," reads a statement from the GIA.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) is updated its grading reports for laboratory-grown diamonds to align with the revised Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Jewelry Guides, and as of  July 1, 2019 will drop term 'synthetic' when referring to diamonds created in a lab. 

  • The Diamond Producers Association (DPA) and Signet Jewelers have published the first results of their ASSURE Program to independently and objectively test the performance of laboratory-grown diamond detectors (Diamond Verification Instruments). The program intends to eventually test and identify each machine on the market concerning how well they detected or referred man-made stones, including the rate at which they gave false positives.

  • Russian diamond miner Alrosa has mentioned several times recently that it is aiming to become the leader in the international market for colored diamonds, and is making its case with a media preview of its collection of large colored diamonds, including unique pink, bright yellow and pink purple gems. The star of the show was a pink oval diamond weighing 14.83 carats - the largest pink diamond in the history of Russia.

  • The GIA (Gemological Institute of America) has developed an illustrated booklet, “Selecting Gem Rough: A Guide for Artisanal Miners,” to help small-scale miners learn more about the quality and classification of the gems they recover, and ultimately to obtain greater market value. As Russel Shor explains, the two pilot projects GIA initiated with Pact, a Washington, D.C.-based non-governmental development organization with offices in Tanzania, are having an impact on these miners' lives.

  • The GIA (Gemological Institute of America) announced yesterday that ALROSA, the world's largest producer of rough diamonds, will participate in the Institute's M2M (Mines to Market) program, its "new digital storytelling platform". GIA's M2M is a digital platform that brings together the Institute's unique ability to scientifically match rough diamonds to the resulting polished gems with information from each step in the value chain, enabling it to tell the compelling story of a diamond's journey.

  • The GIA has announced that Chinese retailer LAELIM Jewelry and Belgian diamond manufacturer IGC Group will pilot GIA’s M2M (Mine to Market) program, which allows for complete transparency and traceability of diamonds along the value chain, writes GIA in a press release. This is one of the first instances where a manufacturer and retailer implemented the M2M program in partnership, and LAELIM is the first retailer in China to participate.

  • Russian diamond mining giant ALROSA is planning to showcase a unique collection of large, fancy-colored diamonds at the Hong Kong Gem & Jewelry Fair in September, reports Rough & Polished. The collection of diamonds the miner will showcase includes 250 stones of different shapes and colors (including very rare colors) - purple, pink, orange and vivid-yellow - and is said to be the largest collection of fancy-colored stones the company has ever presesnted.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) last week published an article on a most curious discovery: "One Natural Melee Diamond Found in Large Batch of HPHT Synthetic Melee".

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has announced that Okavango Diamond Company (ODC) is participating in the Institute’s M2M (Mine to Market) program, a digital platform tracks rough diamonds through to the resulting polished gem. As part of a pilot initiative, a selection of ODC rough diamonds GIA has evaluated for its M2M program will be offered at the ODC July 2018 Spot Auction. The GIA's new service offers retailers a new method of being able to uncover a stone’s history. 

  • The world's most recognized diamond grading institution, GIA (Gemological Institute of America) is launching a pilot program together with leading jewerly retailer, Chow Tai Fook which will use blockchain technology to deliver secure, digital diamond grading reports to consumers for the first time.

  • To celebrate the one-year anniversary of its bijoux boutique on Bond Street in London, Sotheby's Diamonds revealed its most exceptional gem to date: a 102.34-carat, D-Flawless, Type IIa round brilliant diamond, which the auction house describes as “the rarest and most valuable white diamond ever to come to market”. The stone bears the highest possible ratings in terms of color (a D grade representing the purest, whitest hue), clarity (Flawless, meaning there are no internal or external blemishes even when viewed under a microscope) and has excellent cut, polish and symmetry, making it the l

  • World-renowned diamond grading lab GIA has announced it will open a new laboratory in Surat, India and expand its long-term presence in Antwerp, Belgium in the second quarter of 2018 to meet the needs of the global gem and jewelry industry. GIA says it has already secured premises for both locations. In Antwerp, GIA will be occupying space in the Antwerp Diamond Bourse.

  • The latest fraudulent twist on the synthetic diamond landscape has profound implications for the efforts to keep natural and synthetic diamonds separate, if the incident in question is not an isolated one. The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) recently recieved a round brilliant cut diamond (image, left) submitted for an updated diamond grading report. Its girdle was inscribed with an actual GIA report number (image, right), identifying the stone as a natural, untreated diamond. After testing, however, it turned out that the newly submitted diamond was an HPHT-grown synthetic diamond.

  • The largest-ever D-flawless diamond to be put up for auction, mounted in a diamond and emerald necklace, sold for $33.7 million Tuesday night, including buyer’s fees. The white “Creation 1” diamond from Swiss jeweler de Grisogono weighs 163 carats. The hammer went down at 29.5 million Swiss francs ($29.7 million), excluding the buyer’s premium — around the midpoint of the pre-sale estimates before the auction at Christie’s in Geneva. The buyer was not immediately identified.

  • On September 19, GIA (Gemological Institute of America) President and CEO Susan Jacques announced the opening of GIA’s Tokyo campus at a ceremony attended by several industry leaders. Beginning in November, the new GIA campus in Tokyo will offer the Diamond Essentials Intensive and Diamond Grading Lab classes in Japanese.

  • GIA senior industry analyst Russel Shor, in his recent article, "Diamond Producers Aim for Lower Qualities in Today’s Market", explains how sophisticated mining techniques enable major diamond miners to target their drilling to meet polished diamond demand.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) launched a new service which tracks the origin of a selection of polished diamonds, which offers retailers a new method of being able to uncover a stone’s history. Since the project is only two years in development, GIA's M2M™ (Mine to Market) program is restricted and is not yet able to provide a complete solution to determining a diamond’s provenance. “If you just gave me any polished diamond, I can’t tell you what mine it came from,” says Matt Crimmin, GIA’s vice president of laboratory operations. 

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has made an alarming discovery, namely, a natural white diamond covered by a thin (80 microns, or 0.003 inches) synthetic layer that colors it blue – and has warned that more such composites might be on the market. The 0.33-carat stone is a composite of CVD synthetic Type IIb diamond overgrowth on a natural Type Ia diamond.

  • In April 2017, a symposium called, “Synthetic Diamonds: Are Watchmaking and Jewelry in Danger?” was held in Geneva, specifically to address the issue of synthetic diamonds in the domain of watchmaking and how it is possible to differentiate natural from lab-grown stones.

  • Some interesting industry developments took shape at last week's Diamond Detection Expo and Symposium sponsored by India's Gem and Jewellery Export Promotion Council (GJEPC).

  • GIA (Gemological Institute of America), together with international development organization Pact, has launched a pilot study to test a new rough gem guide. The guide was developed specifically to offer basic gemological and market knowledge for artisanal miners in gem-producing regions. The illustrated booklet, available in English and Tanzanian Swahili, was distributed to approximately 45 women miners in the Tanga region of Tanzania. “This project is at the very core of GIA’s mission,” said GIA President and CEO Susan Jacques.

  • Signet Jewelers, as part of its effort to support and reinforce its Responsible Sourcing Protocol for Diamonds (D-SRSP), has been working on a project with product-testing firm United Laboratories and the Diamond Producers Association to create a facility for testing synthetic diamond screening equipment, writes Rapaport News.** The intention is to create an industry standard for such equipment so that, "su

  • Joseph Lipton, inventor and CEO of VULT - a digital diamond exchange platform seeking to turn diamonds into a true tangible asset class - presented his cutting-edge ideas about the future of global wealth at a very special TEDxFultonStreet Salon about “Things You Can’t Have” with other thought leaders in NYC.

  • A research team, led by GIA’s Evan Smith, has made a significant breakthrough in understanding how the biggest and rarest diamonds are born of deep-lying metallic liquid. 

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) on December 5 published the following press release: Following a five-month pilot program which started in June 2016, clients are now able to submit round D-to-Z melee-size diamonds through their fully automated GIA Melee Analysis Service.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) elected industry veteran Dione Kenyon, recently-retired president and CEO of The Jewelers Board of Trade (JBT), as Chair of the GIA Board of Governors, seceding John Green, president and CEO of Lux Bond & Green jewelers, who remains on the board. GIA also inducted Dr. Barbara Dutrow, a professor of geology at Louisiana State University; and Stephen Kahler, senior vice president of global sales operations for Swarovski Gemstones, as its newest members during its November 2016 board meeting held at the Institute’s Carlsbad, Calif.

  • A week after the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) announced that its Hong Kong laboratory recently identified an undisclosed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown diamond weighing 5.19 carats - the largest ever CVD synthetic diamond ever detected - Tom Moses, the GIA’s executive VP and chief laboratory and research officer explains to Michell Graff of The National Jeweler how lab-grown diamond certificates issued by GIA differ from their natur

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has announced that its Hong Kong laboratory recently identified an undisclosed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown diamond weighing 5.19 carats, the largest ever CVD synthetic diamond ever detected, "marking a significant milestone." GIA says that CVD technology has accelerated over the last several years, and the rapidly improving techniques have produced large, high-quality near-colorless and colorless synthetic diamonds.

  • The GIA reports that one of the few surviving copies of a Bolshevik-era catalog of royal jewels seized during the Russian Revolution is available to the public for the first time as part of an extensive digitization project by GIA’s Richard T. Liddicoat Gemological Library and Information Center. This catalog, along with more than 200 other rare and historically significant books on gems and jewelry, is accessible on archive.org.
     

  • If the interest demonstrated at the "Screening & Identification of Synthetic Diamonds" seminar hosted by GIA at last week's India International Jewellery Show is any indication, undisclosed mixing of synthetic and natural diamonds is of great concern in India. The Tribune India writes, "According to industry sources, many small traders are quietly mixing the lab-cultured stones with natural diamonds and palming the consignment off to unsuspecting buyers.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) is joining diamond miners such as De Beers and Alrosa in investigating the possibility of tracking the origin of diamonds, JCK's Rob Bates reports. "The GIA has confirmed talk that chief laboratory and research officer Tom Moses discussed a diamond origin tracking service at the recent JCK show in Las Vegas. While GIA offers origin reports for some colored stones, this would potentially involve tracking a diamond’s movements," he writes.

  • Two Israeli diamond firms – LYE Diamonds Ltd and ESGD Diamonds Ltd belonging to Gaby and Yossi Yelizarov – have laid down a lawsuit in New York against the Rapaport Group and the GIA relating to a case of a mystery treatment that the GIA said temporarily improves a diamond’s color. The GIA said it discovered the treatment last year which it claims temporarily improves a diamond’s color. The lawsuit case relates to a case a year ago when the GIA said that it discovered around 500 diamonds that, in its view, had been treated by a previously unknown color-improving process, JCK explains.

  • The GIA has developed a fully automated system which it says can rapidly and accurately analyze and sort round D-to-Z melee-size diamonds. The system was developed in response to concerns in the gem and jewelry industry about the possibility of synthetic or treated diamonds being mixed into parcels of melee. The pilot for the GIA's Melee Analysis Service will be carried out next month at GIA’s laboratory in New York. The service will be offered at all GIA locations, with the roll out beginning in the third quarter of this year.

  • The GIA is to start using a screening machine for detecting lab-grown diamonds in batches of melee in the next few months, JCK reports. It will not be offered to the trade, however, unlike the melee-screening device that De Beers has developed. The automated device can screen synthetics and treated diamonds from batches of D-to-Z round melee-size stones. It can also sort melee by size and color. The cost of the service will be size-dependent but will likely start at about 10 cents per stone.

  • De Beers Group's International Institute of Diamond Grading and Research (IIDGR) launched its generic diamond grading program last February, entering "what arguably is the most contentious space in the diamond distribution chain where concerns have grown over grading consistency and standards, or lack thereof, in the past few years," writes Rapaport.

  • The Indian government on 30 March exempted from customs duty cut and polished diamonds imported by HRD Antwerp's Mumbai Diamond Institute for grading and re-export, taking the number of such entities enjoying the facility to four. In July last year, the Central Board of Excise and Customs (CBEC) had exempted from customs duties cut and polished diamonds imported for grading or certification and re-export by three laboratories and agencies.

  • The GIA reports that rapid progress in the last few years in High-Pressure, High-Temperature (HPHT) technology is now being used to produce melee-size diamonds around 2–3 mm in diameter and large colorless single crystals all with significantly improved quality and growth rate. A Russian company is reportedly growing multiple large, gem-quality colorless diamond crystals in a single run, while the GIA reports on large diamond crystals manufactured using a similar technology by Jinan Zhongwu New Materials Co. Ltd in Shandong, China.