Archive

  • As blue diamonds have been stealing the headlines for their record-breaking prices achieved at auction, Australia's Merlin Diamonds' recovery of a blue diamond from its Merlin diamond operation in the Northern Territory, while small (0.124 carats), portends well, as it, "does demonstrate

  • Lucapa Diamond Company, the Sydney-listed diamond producer and exploration firm, had started commissioning the modules for the new state-of-the-art XRT processing and recovery stream, a move they announced last summer. The he XRT technology and larger screens (55 mm) recovery and sorting solution will allow recovery of diamonds of up to 1,100 carats. This is the same technology Lucara Diamond used to recover the 1,109-carat Lesedi La Rona.

  • Firestone Diamonds has announced the recovery of the first diamonds at the Liqhobong Diamond Mine is Lesotho as the project moves into the production ramp-up phase. Liqhobong is owned 75% by Firestone and 25% by the Government of Lesotho. The first ore was treated through the plant as scheduled with diamonds reporting to the sort house, and among the initial recoveries were fancy yellow diamonds, as the company expected. Commissioning at the plant is 96% complete and the irst ore blast in the main pit was successfully completed, while waste stripping is on target.

  • Continuing a year of impressive results, Lucapa Diamond Company has reported record diamond production in Q3 2016 from the Lulo Diamond Project in Angola. Sociedade Mineira Do Lulo (SML) produced 8,853 carats from its alluvial operations in the September quarter, a 154% increase over the same period in 2015. This puts YTD production at 14,521 carats, a 233% increase over the first nine months of 2015. Q3 production also included a record number of 'specials' (+10.8 carats), with 137 stones combining for 3,210 carats.

  • Lucapa Diamond Co. Ltd., an ASX-listed Australian company based in Perth, has uncovered yet another exceptional diamond from its Lulo Project in Angola and believes it is closing in on the original source of the gem. The 104-carat Type IIa, D-color diamond is the fourth stone over 100 carats Lucapa has found this year and the fifth overall.

  • Pangolin Diamonds Corp has announced that their drilling program at the Motloutse Diamond Project, located 150 km east of the largest diamond mine in the world, the Orapa Diamond Mine in Botswana, intersected no kimberlite during their August drilling program.

  • Petra Diamonds has found a 138.57-carat Type IIa, D color diamond at the Cullinan mine in South Africa. The diamond will be offered for sale as part of Petra's next sales process in late August in Johannesburg.

  • Mozambique's National Director of Mines Elias Daude last week confirmed that diamonds had been discovered in the Massangena district of the Gaza province, writes Mining Weekly.

  • Discoveries of diamonds on land along Namibia's coastline in the southern Atlantic may extend ground-based mining operations by another 50 years, said the country's Finance Minister, Calle Schlettwein. Namibia is the world’s largest producer of marine gems. Namdeb Diamond Corp., jointly owned by the Namibian government and De Beers, came across diamond deposits after pushing back the sea wall at its land-based operations, Schlettwein told Bloomberg.

  • PJSC ALROSA reports the start of the development of a new deposit, the Zarya pipe at Aikhal Mining and Processing Division. Today, the first commercial blasting triggered the first stage of the deposit development - surface stripping to remove barren sedimentary rock overlying the ore body. The mine is to reach its design capacity of 1 million tons of ore per year by 2021. The mine life is expected to be 13 years.

  • Namibian diamond miners working off the coast of Africa discovered a 500-year-old shipwreck loaded with around $14 million of gold and coins. The 'Bom Jesus' - or 'Good Jesus' - was first discovered along the Namibian coast near Oranjemund by geologists from De Beers in April 2008. It was found by the miners as they drained a man-made salt water lake along the Skeleton Coast. Although many shipwrecks have been discovered along the coastal area, this was the oldest and the first to be loaded down with coin and ivory tusks, according to the Mail Online.

  • Russian diamond mining giant ALROSA has announced the recovery of a 207.29-carat rough diamond from the Zarnitsa pipe at Udachny Mining and Processing Division in the Russian Republic of Yakutia. The gem-quality rough diamond measures 38.0 х 37.0 х 18.0 mm and is the largest diamond discovered in the history of Zarnitsa. The extracted stone represents a transparent transitional crystal form with a slightly grooved surface. The diamond has no name so far.

  • Pangolin Diamonds Corp. reports that one of seven diamonds from the MSC Grid in Botswana is a Type II nitrogen-free diamond. Approximately 2% of the world’s diamonds are classified as Type II diamonds. The firm said that Type II diamonds are often associated with the presence of large diamonds, such as the 813-carat and 1,109-carat diamonds found at the Karowe mine by Lucara Diamonds which are both Type II diamonds. The Karowe mine is approximately 105 kilometers northwest of the MSC Grid area.

  • Following the meeting of ALROSA’s special commission, company president Andrey Zharkov signed an order to dedicate an 83.59-carat gem quality diamond to mothers by naming it "Mothers of Russia". ALROSA recovered a 83.59-carat diamond on February 13, 2016, from Yubileynaya pipe. The Aikhal Mining and Processing Division extracted the stone from plant No.14. The diamond, said to be of "2 Black Sawables 3 color" quality contains small graphite-sulphide inclusions, is octahedron-shaped and is transparent with a yellowish hue. The stone measures 28mm x 26.5mm x 26mm.

  • Diamcor Mining Inc. has announced the recovery of two “special” gem-quality rough diamonds (+10.8 carats), an 11.64 and a 12.73 carat stone, from its Krone-Endora at Venetia Project in South Africa.

  • After a week of speculation and a temporary suspension of trading in the company's securities, Lucapa Diamond Company announced the discovery of the biggest recorded diamond in Angola, confirmed as a Type IIa D-color gem-quality stone. The 404-carat diamond from the Perth-based company’s Lulo project is also the 27th biggest recorded diamond in the world and the biggest diamond ever discovered by an Australian company. Lucapa has not yet valued the diamond, but recent sales of large special diamonds suggest it could be worth more than $20 million.

  • Pangolin Diamonds has announced the recovery of an eighth diamond from its wholly-owned Malatswae Diamond Project, in an area of the project that is located 105 km southeast of the Karowe diamond mine operated by Lucara Diamonds in Botswana. To date, seven of the eight diamonds recovered are white in color. The new discovery is one of four diamonds (three white and one brown) that have been reported from within an area of 0.32 km2. Olivine, ilmenites with reaction rims and a mantle xenolith, in addition to the four diamonds, have also been recovered from the same area.

  • Following the discovery of a 1,111-carat stone, the largest diamond to be found for 100 years, as well as an 813-carat stone and a 374-carat diamond, Lucara says it will invest between $15 million and $18 million on an additional large diamond recovery process at its Karowe mine in Botswana. The move is due to the fact that the current process circuit has been designed to recover diamonds to a maximum size of up to 1,000 carats.

  • Russian diamond mining company Alrosa's Supervisory Board decided to leave the firm's rough output target unchanged at 38 million carats for this year, the company said in an announcement. It also approved a revised budget for 2015, due to changes in the market and international financial conditions, including inflation and currency exchange rates.

  • Dropping diamond prices caused by lower growth in Chinese jewelry demand is reducing the appeal of Canada's Arctic diamond industry, with falling exploration budgets hitting the region’s long-term prospects. Exploration spending in Canada's diamond-rich Northwest Territories (NWT), the world's third-biggest producer, is forecast to drop 54 percent this year, according to a Canadian government estimate.

  • The Wall Street Jounal takes an inside look at De Beers' efforts to uncover the first major diamond mine in at least 20 years, an exploration drive that started in earnest last year in the southern desert of Botswana. "De Beers’ undertaking highlights the dilemma faced by diamond miners," writes Scott Patterson of the WSJ, "who are forecasting diminishing supplies if they don’t discover new caches of gems. Only a blockbuster discovery will enable them to keep long-term production at current levels, according to De Beers and analysts.

  • In a statement to investors, Lucapa Diamond Co. - based in Perth, Western Australia, and listed on the ASX - announced the recovery of 14 more “special” diamonds, including a 74.5 carat stone, from ongoing mining and treatment at Block 8 on the Lulo diamond project in Angola. All diamonds were greater than 10.8 carats, while the 74.5 carat diamond was confirmed as Type IIa D-colour stone and the fourth biggest stone recovered to date at Lulo.

  • Linking to a press release via its Twitter account, North Arrow Minerals has confirmed four diamondiferous kimberlites at the Pikoo Diamond Project in Saskatchewan. Following on the their report of September 8, 2015 that confirmed kimberlite PK150 as significantly diamond-bearing, North Arrow today release a statement reading, "the 2015 exploration program at the Pikoo Diamond Project is now complete and new microdiamond results for the PK314 and PK311 kimberlites have increased the total number of diamondiferous kimberlites at Pikoo to four." Ken Armstrong, President and CEO of North Arrow

  • Zimbabwe's deputy minister of mines and mining developments, Fred Moyo, said his country has more than 100 kimberlite pipes which it needs foreign partners to help develop. He was speaking at an annual two-day mining and infrastructure indaba (an African term meaning important conference) in the capital, Harare. Foreign investors have shown little interest in investing in Zimbabwe due to the country's political situation. In addition, they have reportedly been further deterred by the government's unilateral move to merge all the firms mining in the Marange area.

  • Alrosa partner Botswana Diamonds' latest drilling update in the Orapa region of Botswana was met with disappointment by the market after initial field analysis suggested this rock was ultramafic rock older than the kimberlites found in the Orapa area. Two holes of the three-hole drilling programme intersected an anomaly discovered by Alrosa but they did not find what they were anticipating. There were, however, significant Kimberlite Indicator Minerals (KIMs) in its core, and these have been taken back to Russia for full analysis and identification.

  • Lucapa Diamond Company has been stealing the headlines recently with 90-carat Type IIA stones, fancy pinks and yellows, an average price of $1,667 per carat and soaring stocks, and now it has announced that it has identified confirmed kimberlite (L259) next to a world-class diamond field at Lulo in Angola.

  • The Lucapa diamond company has announced the discovery of three more large special diamonds, weighing 40.59 carats, 28.13 carats and 23.32 carats from its Lulo project in Angola's Lunda Norte province. The largest of the three diamonds is a Type IIa stone, the firm said in a statement. The explorer said that its Mining Block B is "emerging as a prolific source of large valuable diamonds of up to 131.4 carats recovered from this area to date."

  • North Arrow Minerals has reported on new micro-diamond results from the PK150 and PK312 kimberlites, and confirms the discovery of new kimberlite PK311, increasing the number of discrete kimberlite occurrences within the Pikoo Project in central eastern Saskatchewan to seven. A sample returned significant numbers of kimberlite indicator minerals (KIMs).

  • Level Diamonds of Antwerp has announced a joint venture with Minico (DRC) for reopening and exploiting their mine in Western Kasai. The mine has reopened for production after almost a decade of standing idle. Following a year and a half of investments and reorganisation (administrative, operational) and a new management team, the mine is back to production. Having vast reserves in the hundreds of thousands of carats, the joint venture plans for the mine to deliver 7,000-10,000ct p/m within 6 to 12 months.

  • The operations of De Beers Consolidated Mines (DBCM) will dwindle further with the proposed sale of Kimberley Mines, but Philip Barton, the company’s CEO, believes that DBCM has some surprises in store for its followers. "We are actively exploring in South Africa. We really believe there are a few more diamond mines left in the country that will fit into the criteria of De Beers and Anglo American," he says. De Beers has explored SA for decades, but modern geological data collection started being stored since the late 1950s. De Beers has an enormous data base from these records.

  • Lucara Diamond Corp. announced the results from its first Exceptional Stone Tender of 2015. The special tender of diamonds from the Karowe Mine in Botswana was completed on July 16, 2015 and consisted of 14 single stone lots. All 14 diamonds, totaling 1,647 carats were sold for gross revenues of $68.71 million ($41,028 per carat). Highlights among these exceptional stones were: 12 diamonds sold for more than $1.0 million each including 5 stones which sold for in excess of $4.0 million each.

  • The Australia-based firm found the gem-quality stones at its Save River alluvial diamond license area. It is thought to be the first known recovery of commercial quality diamonds in the country which is much better known as a source of precious colored gemstones.

  • About 35 million years ago an asteroid about 5 to 8 kilometers in diameter, travelling at a speed of about 15 to 20 kilometers per second slammed into the area that is now known as the Tamyr Peninsula of northern Siberia, Russia. Geology.com takes an in-depth look at news stories claiming the Popigai Crater is a major diamond deposit containing trillions of carats of gemstone-quality diamonds kept secret by Russia.

  • Kimberlites are being discovered in rapid succession at the Pikoo diamond field in central eastern Saskatchewan, and work is well underway to turn it into Canada's 'next big' play. North Arrow Minerals found three new kimberlites in March, basically doubling the size of the body and picking up indicators the body is open to the east. But you don’t get a ‘diamond region’ going without others jumping in, and in Strike Diamonds, Pikoo moved from a one company play to several. Adding to the growing din around the area, none of these companies were there first.

  • Only 3 months after recovering a 76.07ct diamond from Yubileynaya kimberlite pipe, Alrosa has recovered a 78ct diamond from the Mir pipe. They estimate that the stone may be valued at more than $600,000 if auctioned.

  • Kennady Diamonds reports its spring drill program at Faraday 1 and 2 has successfully delineated two new pipe-like kimberlites at Kennady North. Based on these results Kennady has increased its tonnage target for the Kelvin – Faraday kimberlite corridor, which they now estimate has the potential to host between 12 million and 15 million tonnes.

  • A team of specialists from four Australian universities say they found the exact source of a diamond-bearing rock for the first time. According to Phys.org, the rocks, known as orangeites formed from lava produced by massive volcanic eruption tens of millions of years ago, are already commonly found in South Africa. However, the new study now reveals that they may be present in much higher abundance worldwide, including in Australia.

  • A geologist has discovered a thorny, palmlike plant in Liberia that seems to grow only on top of kimberlite pipes—columns of volcanic rock hundreds of meters across that extend deep into Earth, and could be simple, powerful way of finding diamond-rich deposits. Miners have long known that particular plants can signal ore-bearing rocks, but the new plant, identified as Pandanus candelabrum, is the first indicator species for diamond-bearing kimberlite, says Stephen Haggerty, a researcher at Florida International University in Miami and the chief exploration officer of Youssef Diamon

  • Anant Singh Yadav is perhaps the only farmer in Bundelkhand region of Madhya Pradesh who is a lakhpati (millionaire). He pulled it off by striking diamond from a 2-hectare shallow diamond mine adjacent to his farm field that he took on lease. People in Panna try their luck by taking annual lease of these mines. This time Yadav got a 12.93 carat diamond. As provisioned in the law, Yadav had to pay only 11.5 % of the royalty of the total price of the diamond fixed by the administration to get the diamond. 

  • DiamondCorp has unearthed a 19.83 carat diamond at Lace, the largest stone yet recovered from its underground development at the mine in South Africa. The diamond was found during the current work to develop the high grade Upper K4 (UK4) block, which Diamondcorp expects to start mining in the second half of the year, four months ahead of plan.