Archive

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) last week published an article on a most curious discovery: "One Natural Melee Diamond Found in Large Batch of HPHT Synthetic Melee".

  • Dominion Diamonds has announced that sales of Ekati Diamond Mine and Diavik Diamond Mine diamonds fell 27% in Q4 2017 (November 2016 through January 2017) and 21% overall in FY 2017, despite the quantity of diamonds sold increasing 24% in Q4 and 61% for the year. It has also provided Q4 production results from its Ekati Mine, where carat production increased by 93% compared to the same period in the prior year due to the positive impact of processing of a large proportion of high grade Misery ore.

  • Avi Krawitz of Rapaport News sat down with Joseph Kuzi, CEO of EGL Asia and director of Diamond Services, a Hong-Kong based synthetics testing facility, to talk about the phenomenon of undisclosed synthetic diamonds. He heard that the technology behind and production of synthetic diamonds is increasing rapidly, and just because we do not hear about every instance where undisclosed mixing of synthetic and natural diamonds is discovered, does not mean it is not widespread.

  • Two weeks ago, IDEX Online published an opinion piece by Thierry Silber, CEO and founder of Diamaz International and Madestones, entitled "How to Kill Four Birds With One Stone". Here Silber makes the following proposal on the way to tackle the heated issue of undisclosed mixing of natural and synthetic diamonds: "Why not remove the mixing issue by selling both types of smaller diamonds at the same price up to a certain size?" The main problem as he sees it is the cost of detection involved in screening for synthetic diamonds, particularly for smaller manufacturers.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has announced that its Hong Kong laboratory recently identified an undisclosed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown diamond weighing 5.19 carats, the largest ever CVD synthetic diamond ever detected, "marking a significant milestone." GIA says that CVD technology has accelerated over the last several years, and the rapidly improving techniques have produced large, high-quality near-colorless and colorless synthetic diamonds.

  • If the interest demonstrated at the "Screening & Identification of Synthetic Diamonds" seminar hosted by GIA at last week's India International Jewellery Show is any indication, undisclosed mixing of synthetic and natural diamonds is of great concern in India. The Tribune India writes, "According to industry sources, many small traders are quietly mixing the lab-cultured stones with natural diamonds and palming the consignment off to unsuspecting buyers.

  • By Chaim Even-Zohar. Reprinted from Diamond Intelligence Briefs by special arrangement.

  • IDEX India conducted a wide-ranging interview with Russell Mehta, vice chairman of the Gem and Jewelry Export Promotion Council (GJEPC), and CEO of Rosy Blue (India), about the current state of affairs in the Indian diamond industry. The single biggest challenge, according to Mehta, is the ‘ease of doing business’.

  • When Leonardo DiCaprio, who starred in the movie Blood Diamond, says he’s backing a start-up company to produce synthetic diamonds because this will ensure that the product is “ethically produced”, the whole world listens to him. And they think we are an industry that cannot be trusted. We have to prove him wrong.

    - Sanjay Kothari addresses three major issues facing diamond industry: undisclosed synthetics, businesses taking on debt while knowing they are heading for bankruptcy, and illegal tampering with diamond certificates.

  • The Israel Diamond Exchange today announced it is setting up a team of arbitrators to settle claims by bourse members concerning deals of GIA-certified stones which have been deleted from the GIA website. Application claims must be made at the IDE's legal department. Investigations, both by IDE and GIA into the matter are ongoing.

  • Rapaport reports GIA is recalling 424 diamond grading reports in the case of some 500 diamonds of which GIA suspects that they were treated with a process that temporarily improved their color by up to three grades.

  • The World Federation of Diamond Bourses' President, Ernie Blom, said there would be zero tolerance in cases such as those where the GIA found around 500 colorless, to near-colorless diamonds submitted mostly at its lab in Ramat Gan, Israel, which were potentially subjected to an undisclosed temporary treatment.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) reported that approximately 500 colorless to near-colorless diamonds that were submitted primarily to GIA’s grading laboratory in Ramat Gan, Israel, were potentially subjected to an undisclosed temporary treatment. The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has issued a laboratory alert recalling 424 diamond grading reports. The diamonds were treated with a process that temporarily improved their color by up to three grades.

  • This month the Russian Jewelers Guild - representing some 90 industry players - will adopt a charter obliging its members to disclose what kind of gems are used in jewelry - natural or lab-grown says Eduard Utkin, CEO of the Russian Jewelers Guild in an interview with Izvestia Daily. Last week, the State Duma adopted the amendments proposed by the Ministry of Finance to the law "On Precious Metals and Precious Stones" in its third reading. One of them contains a commitment on the part of jewelry stores to indicate on a sealed label, whether a jewelry piece has a synthetic or natural stone.

  • Rob Bates (JCK) reports during the Basel Show, GGTL Laboratories discovered a small CVD synthetic diamond F color, IF clarity in a parcel of around 6,000 natural diamonds that were purchased in India. The lab also recently found a melee-sized vivid yellow in a parcel from Hong Kong. Bates adds the finds are no need for panic but highlight the importance of having stones tested and buying from trusted sources.