Archive

  • "… the return of a relevant generic diamond marketing campaign is a blessing. 'Real is rare. A diamond is real' fits the changed social attitude and naturally takes the torch [on] from 'A diamond is forever.' The new slogan immediately addresses the rarity of natural diamonds. People have always been interested in owning items that are rare, we have always treasured and been awed by rare creations. Rare objects are desired and tend to carry premiums."

    Diamond veteran Ehud Laniado praising the new slogan of the Diamond Producers Association.

  • Charles Wyndham is left singularly unimpressed with the Diamond Producers Association (DPA) new slogan, as part of its marketing strategy, of ‘Real is Rare. Real is a diamond.’ It falls far short of the legendary ‘A Diamond is Forever’ slogan which hit the emotional value of diamonds and also the fact they are a store of value. But it also aims for the wrong target and even succeeds in missing that, he comments. "My assumption is that the key aim of this tag line is to combat the threat of synthetic, or as I would prefer [to call them] cultured diamonds.

  • Forevermark will be promoting its 'Ever Us' two-stone diamond collection in the fourth quarter aimed at driving consumers into jewelry stores during the holiday season. Forevermark executives said at the JCK Show they would focus on emotional, product-specific advertising. The campaign will include a nationally televised commercial featuring the Ever Us two-stone diamond collection, showing the bypass ring as well as other two-stone designs including earrings and pendants. In addition to the commercial, the Ever Us Forevermark ads also will run in digital and social media.

  • Rio Tinto is focusing its global diamond sales and marketing initiatives on tracked jewelry collections "with a clear and transparent chain of custody, from the mine to the market" particularly aimed at the younger generation who want clear information regarding the provenance of gems. Simon Trott, managing director of Rio Tinto Diamonds, said: “Increasingly the value of a diamond is tied to where and how the diamond was mined, how it was cut and polished and the process of bringing it to sale.

  • "Real is Rare. Real is a Diamond". The Diamond Producers Association today delivered a special presentation to members of the diamond industry at the JCK Trade Show in Las Vegas to reveal the long-awaited compaign slogan and platform with which they hope to attract the generation of Millennials. The DPA's marketing campaign, intended to fill the void since De Beers ceased generic marketing, is the result of six months of development, including in-depth research into its target audience: millennial consumers.

  • Online diamond and jewelry retailer Blue Nile has opened the second of its 'Webrooms' at the Westchester Mall in White Plains, New York. It opened its first Webroom in June 2015 at Roosevelt Field Mall in Garden City, New York. Webrooms are display locations that provide a retail experience for consumers to see more than 400 goods available for sale which can then be ordered on a PC, by smartphone or via a tablet. Sales can also be made online via in-store tablets and with the help of non-commissioned consultants.

  • Gemfields has named Sally Morrison director of marketing and sales, Americas. She was until recently the managing director of marketing at the Diamond Producers Association which aims to promote diamonds generically. She previously held senior roles with A Diamond Is Forever, Forevermark and the World Gold Council. Gemfields CEO Ian Harebottle said that Morrison's role "will be pivotal as we continue to expand and the U.S. announces several new marketing strategies.”

  • Hong Kong-based jewelry retailer Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group has beat 107 luxury brands in the fashion, watch, jewelry and leather goods sectors to be named as China’s most digitally proficient jewelry brand in 2016, mainly due to its strong e-commerce strategy, according to the 'Digital IQ Index' by digital intelligence firm L2 Inc. The report cited the jeweler’s solid e-commerce strategy and creative use of social media platforms such as WeChat.

  • Diamond industry analyst Ehud Laniado takes an in-depth look at why diamonds are not fulfilling their economic 'promise' as a luxury investment that will appreciate in value. Comparing the performance of diamonds to other luxury items bought out of 'passion', he determines that the lack of marketing is hurting diamonds' potential to be perceived as an asset rather than just an expense. But he has a plan.  

  • Diamond firm Hearts On Fire (HOF) has appointed luxury industry veteran Stephane Barraque as its new Global Chief Revenue Officer. The role was created to lead all commercial activities for Hearts On Fire globally, and support the further development of the brand globally through wholesale, retail, e-commerce, and joint venture channels. With more than 25 years of experience in the development of luxury brands, Barraque will also be responsible for identifying new global business opportunities.

  • The short YouTube film follows the personal moments of a bride and groom on their wedding day and features a selection of bride’s jewelry pieces, groom’s rings and other items, and jewelry for the mother of the bride.

  • The Diamond Producers Association (DPA) will unveil its diamond promotional campaign at the JCK Show in Las Vegas in June. It will be the first such campaign not sponsored by De Beers. It stemmed from research on millennials, including extensive surveys and focus groups conducted by its marketing firm Mother New York, writes Rob Bates for JCK.

  • "This June at the JCK Las Vegas show," writes Rob Bates for JCK, "the Diamond Producers Association (DPA) will unveil an industry milestone: the first category-driving campaign for diamonds not sponsored by De Beers. The DPA’s campaign grew out of its research on millennials, including extensive surveys and focus groups conducted by its marketing firm Mother New York." Bates plans to take an in-depth look at their research between now and then, but provides a few spoilers about what they found out.

  • Martin Rapaport has written an in-depth diatribe rejecting the claims of sythetic diamand producers that their product is more ethical than naturally mined diamonds, exposing the value proposition of synthetic diamonds as a ruse and calling natural diamond miners to join together to aggressively market and natural diamonds and attack synthetics. It is nothing less than a call to arms for the natural diamond industry, and he goes so far as to call the way synthetic diamonds are marketed as "evil".

  • Online diamond and jewelry retailer Blue Nile is opening yet another physical location as it seeks to unite Internet sales with a brick-and-mortar presence. The latest 'Webroom' will be opened in the summer at the Washington Square Mall in Portland, Oregon. Last week, Blue Nile announced its third such online/offline hybrid retail model would be opened near Washington D.C. following two such stores being opened in New York.

  • International Gemological Institute (IGI) North America has begun a national advertising campaign on U.S. cable TV to raise consumer awareness about, and confidence in, the diamond and fine jewelry industry. The adverts started airing on Fox News, MSNBC, CNBC, CNN, HLN and Time Warner Cable NY1 News from March 14, according to an IGI statement Monday. They are focused on educating consumers about the need for independently graded and evaluated diamonds, which would in turn provide peace of mind and incentivize them to buy fine gemstone jewelry.

  • In his latest article, "How Do We Talk About Ethical Sourcing?", Rob Bates of JCK unpacks some of the key tensions lurking underneath marketing strategies that promote the ethical or eco-friendly advantages of synthetic diamond products, and even some of their natural counterparts. Analyzing recent statements by Suzanne Miglucci, the new president and CEO of moissanite manufacturer Charles & Colvard, Bates points out how the strategy they imply could rub retailers the wrong way and even involve "certain perils" when it comes to integrating into the diamond industry as a whole.

  • Sally Morrison, Managing Director of Marketing of the Diamond Producers Association (DPA), will leave the organization in May to pursue another professional opportunity. Morrison, a veteran of Forevermark, World Gold Council (WGC) and the De Beers account at JWT joined the DPA late last October, so today's announcement comes a mere five months after her appointment. To ensure continuity of momentum in the DPA’s U.S.

  • JCK devotes an extensive article on tips and tricks for jewelers to maximize the power of Instagram, “social media’s most jewelry friendly marketing tool”. More than any other social media platform, Instagram is focused on visuals, and thus a perfect match with jewelry items. But Martha C. White argues Instagram requires a very different approach compared to traditional ads and sums up the essentials on using instagram successfully, such as using pictures and background styling that help to tell a story  that goes beyond the jewelry item itself.

  • The Millennial generation, young adults born between 1980 and 2000, is poised to become the largest spending power in history over the next decade as they move into their peak spending years, writes Sam Willoughby, joint director of International Jewellery London, in GemKonnect. They are higher educated, digital natives, and, in Europe, account for a quarter of the adult population. If they are not retailers' target customers now, they soon will be which means the jewelry industry needs to start understanding how to market to them now.

  • "The World Diamond Mark (WDM) has developed and started to implement the fundraising from retail end of the industry and from outside service providers. This endeavour will continue. Soon the miners, through the DPA, and retailers, led by the WDM, will have the funds. If the midstream industry will not follow, its market share and profitability will shrink even further. [...] In this respect the role of major centres and bourses is paramount.

  • With a touch of hyperbole, The Times of India writes that, "a fierce marketing battle is on the cards between companies making lab-grown diamonds and those producing natural ones to woo consumers across the globe" as demand for diamonds stagnates.

  • In a Gemkonneckt blogpost, industry veteran Mark Boston enunciates how lab-grown producers such as The Diamond Foundry seem to be using unsubstantiated anti-natural diamond industry rhetorics as a marketing strategy.

  • A new campaign by the luxury jeweler tells the story of the craftsmen behind the firm's famous Tiffany® Setting engagement ring. “When our founder Charles Tiffany introduced the Tiffany® Setting in 1886, he gave us not only a symbol of true love, but also an enduring reminder of our diamond heritage and reputation for craftsmanship,” said Caroline Naggiar, chief marketing officer of Tiffany & Co. “What better way to celebrate the 130th anniversary of this handcrafted ring than to honor its makers.”

  • DAuction, a new venture in Antwerp supported by Windiam and Unico Diamonds, will be holding polished diamond auctions offering rare fancy color diamonds and large white stones with improved conditions for buyers, including lower commissions. Gon Raz, DAuction’s managing partner and co-owner of Windiam, said, “Diamond dealers look for additional selling channels. We have had positive feedback from leading companies in Belgium and abroad. Not only do they believe in the concept, they also trust us to achieve attractive prices with their rarest diamonds.

  • In a feature article on the GemKonnect blog, Nirupa Bhatt writes that, "I am a woman in an industry which relies almost entirely on women to survive and grow. And yet has less than one percent women involved in this business in any significant capacity including strategy, marketing, product design and development." This led her to ask a "simple yet, a profound question - does the industry really know what women want?" She notes that, "The jewelry industry does employ a great many women, [but] most of them are usually at the sales counter.

  • Suffice it to say that we disagree with the content of the Rapaport article. From a De Beers perspective, alongside the price adjustments we’ve made this year, we’ve taken a range of decisive action to help address the inventory indigestion issue in the midstream (which has been at the heart of the recent challenges) and to support demand pull-through. These actions include substantial additional supply flexibility for our customers, as well as a major additional Q4 marketing investment in the US and China, the world’s two leading diamond Jewellery markets.

  • Tiffany & Co. has reclaimed its position this year as the leader of an index published by business intelligence firm L2 Inc, maintaining 
a 14-point lead over runner-up Cartier "based partly on its unparalleled SEO performance on competitive category keywords like 'engagement ring.' The brand also distinguished itself on social media with campaigns like 'Will You?' and 'Concierge of Love' – an interactive Valentine’s Day campaign pairing social media programming with an interactive gift guide on the brand site.

  • Giving a new interpretation to the 'shotgun wedding', a Florida jeweler is running a Christmas promotion - buy a diamond, get a shotgun. Two neighboring stores in DeLand, Florida - Downtown Goldsmith & Engraving and 2nd Amendment Firearms - have teamed up to offer a free shotgun with a qualifying jewelry purchase. The Savage 12-gauge pump action shotgun – worth about $270 – is available to anyone buying pearls, diamonds or gemstones that cost from $450 to $4,000, according to FOX35.

  • A brilliant advert for Long's Jewelers in Boston shows a young couple apparently taking a selfie, but in reality being dazzled by the diamond engagement ring the fiancée has just received. Check it out.

  • Blue Nile's 15 second commercial titled “Engagement Ring Shopping Shouldn’t Be Scary,” showing a millennial shopper welcomed by a scary looking brick-and-mortar jeweler, is causing much debate among industry analysts.

  • I don’t think it will take much marketing to see a lot of those [smaller] goods flow into consumers’ hands...Generic marketing has slowed down, so diamonds are not on the forefront of people’s minds anymore, and therefore they default into [buying] other things. It’s really [about] targeting those people that will be spending up to $1,000 on a piece of jewelry, where that money’s now flowing somewhere else. How do we bring that money back to buying diamonds?

  • The upscale jewelry firm's advert has already become the most popular release this year of an online advertisement by any of the major diamond jewelers. The 90-second Ad featuring Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend, had been seen 1,735,074 times by December 1, a week after it was posted on the luxury group’s official YouTube page.

  • INSTOREMAG.com has created a desktop wallpaper / background that promulgates a message of peace, hope and prosperity from the jewelry business to its frazzled, distracted customers as the all-important holiday season begins.

  • Shared socially as well as within an email sent to subscribers, the French jeweler's film is a take on Marilyn Monroe’s 1953 musical number in the film 'Gentlemen Prefer Blondes,' where the actress famously sings 'Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend.'

  • This week's Kimberley Process Plenary in Angola has not been without its share of controversy, with civil society announcing that it will not participate in a UAE-led KP in 2016 and World Diamond Council (WDC) President Edward Asscher welcoming the criticism (when justified) as well as participation of the NGOs.

  • Oleg Petrov will start in the new position as of today (November 16). The USO is the ALROSA division responsible for sorting, valuation, pre-sale preparation and sale of diamonds. Petrov joined ALROSA in September as adviser to the company’s president. Before that, he was sales and marketing director at PJSC Uralkali, responsible for sales and exports from the Russian Federation, and logistics and financing.

  • Falling sales and shrinking margins have motivated the Indian diamond trade to consider teaming up with miners like Rio Tinto, ALROSA and De Beers to launch a marketing campaign in strategic markets like China, Latin America and the Middle East. The plan is to get international advertising agencies and celebrities to promote diamonds, which have recently experienced a decline in demand.

  • JCK reports Pandora, the Danish retailer known for its charms and bracelets, sold less of its signature products in the US, while total sales grew 5,7%, the single market that didn't show double digit growth the company said. The drop in sales of bracelets was affected by a different promotional approach, JCK reports, as a campaign promoting other products "The Art of You" replaced Pandora's traditional "Unforgettable Moments" promotion for bracelets. 

  • Michelle Graff of National Jeweler considers De Beers/Forevermark's new holiday commercial (It’s a Long Journey to Become the One), which revisits the "A Diamond is Forever" theme of yesteryear, and wonders why De Beers did not take this opportunity to show where Forevermark diamonds come from and how they are helping the communities where they are mined. "Why didn’t Forevermark emphasize its responsibly sourced origins in this year’s holiday advertising campaign?" They could have.