Archive

  • The GIA has started providing the GIA Diamond Focus Report, a low-cost digital report for natural, D-to-Z color, round brilliant-cut diamonds weighing between 0.15 and 0.29 carats. Laser inscription of the GIA report number is also included.

  • The Gemological Institute of America has banned five Indian companies from further submissions to its grading lab, alleging they inscribed diamonds with GIA report numbers not associated with those gems. “We reasonably suspect that stones submitted under your client account, and other accounts for which we believe you to be partnered, have been inscribed with preexisting GIA report numbers that were not issued for the particular stones being submitted and that GIA did not inscribe,” said the letter from lab director Tom Moses to a principal of Surat-based Cristy Gems.

  • At a time when diamond exports have been falling, the government has decided to exempt cut and polished diamonds imported by three laboratories in India from customs duty.

  • European Gemological Laboratory (EGL) operations outside of North America will adopt a unified grading standard to restore the reputation of the lab's grading reports, the company announced on Monday.

  • Rob Bates, JCK News Director, in his blog argues that the recent announcement by industry associations, saying industry professionals that carry reports that deviate by more than one color grade from the standard GIA scale will be subject to arbitration, could be a game changer. Overgrading has been a widespread trade practice, Bates says, and a dangerous one now that lawyers have announced they are intending to initiate a wider class action, targeting these malpractices.

  • The Israel Diamond Exchange today announced it is setting up a team of arbitrators to settle claims by bourse members concerning deals of GIA-certified stones which have been deleted from the GIA website. Application claims must be made at the IDE's legal department. Investigations, both by IDE and GIA into the matter are ongoing.

  • In an interview with JCK, Susan Jacques, GIA's CEO and chief laboratory and research officer Tom Moses tell Rob Bates increased capacity and global expansion - potentially opening up an additional lab in Surat - will allow GIA to avoid future backlogs. Furthermore GIA says differences between grading results in overseas labs are rare and GIA uses dummy accounts to rule out these variations as much as possible. Other topics Bates raises include automated grading, the reputation of GIA grading standards and undisclosed synthetics.

  • The GIA's ninth annual open day on June 12 will open its doors to the public for a range of seminars. These include a discussion of gemology, diamonds, ruby, sapphires, and emeralds, the history and value elements of pearls, jewelry design, and how to study with the GIA.

  • The GIA is close to working out what the mystery treatment was aimed at temporarily improved the color of some 500 diamonds submitted for the most part to its Israel lab, GIA President and CEO Susan Jacques said at the annual Rapaport conference on grading standards on May 31. Phil Yantzer, vice president of GIA’s Carlsbad lab services, said: “We know what is being done, but we don’t know how it is being done." Most of the stones were “off-color,” however since such diamonds are common, that didn’t raise an alarm.

  • Times have changed. Remember when a retail jeweler was the first and only stop when purchasing a diamond? Today, the traditional retailer competes with more than just other jewelry stores for the diamond sale. It seems that everyone is now in the diamond business, from big box stores to department stores to countless Internet sites. Add to this challenge shrinking margins and the increasing number of shoppers willing to make a big purchase online and it makes a bricks-and-mortar jewelry store owner almost want to hang it up.

  • In the wake of GIA's announcement on May 12 concerning 424 colorless to near-colorless diamonds that were discovered to have potentially been subjected to an undisclosed, temporary treatment which can lead to a higher grade, the Diamond Dealers Club of New York and the Diamond Manufacturers & Importers Association of America have issued a joint statement condemning such practices, stating, "Disciplinary action will be taken if any member fails to follow DDC and DMIA rules and regulations regarding proper disclosure ...

  • The results of an enquiry by Israel Diamond Exchange appointed bodies will decide how the bourse proceeds with the issue.

  • Rapaport reports GIA is recalling 424 diamond grading reports in the case of some 500 diamonds of which GIA suspects that they were treated with a process that temporarily improved their color by up to three grades.

  • The World Federation of Diamond Bourses' President, Ernie Blom, said there would be zero tolerance in cases such as those where the GIA found around 500 colorless, to near-colorless diamonds submitted mostly at its lab in Ramat Gan, Israel, which were potentially subjected to an undisclosed temporary treatment.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) reported that approximately 500 colorless to near-colorless diamonds that were submitted primarily to GIA’s grading laboratory in Ramat Gan, Israel, were potentially subjected to an undisclosed temporary treatment. The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has issued a laboratory alert recalling 424 diamond grading reports. The diamonds were treated with a process that temporarily improved their color by up to three grades.

  • The Better Diamond Initiative (BDI) has gone in search of the truth behind the Gemological Institute of America's (GIA) recent statement that, “…there has been an increase in undisclosed synthetics…”, but found no details about 'reported' mixing incidents and GIA declined to respond to their inquiry. This leads BDI to ponder whether it is all a marketing ploy to encourage diamond testing.

  • Seven of the world’s biggest diamond firms will showcase rare diamonds from April 29 through May 11, with 25 diamonds ranging from a pair of boots set with 1,527 carats of diamonds to a 50.05 carat D color, Flawless diamond briolette. The diamond houses are Chow Tai Fook, Diacore, Diarough, Mouawad, Adler, Chatila, and MUNNU The Gem Palace.

  • The new service gives access to the GIA's information resources for 650 million Internet users who use Chinese as their principal language.

  • The Gemological Institute of America is spotting more undisclosed lab-grown diamonds at its grading labs, says Tom Moses, executive vice president of GIA laboratory and research, even though the quantity of undisclosed synthetics remains a small proportion of the diamonds submitted to GIA. 

  • Sarine Technologies Ltd. has announced the successful completion of an in-depth evaluation of its new DiaMension Axiom platform and Instructor software by the GIA which has completed the conversion from DiaVision software, verified and adopted by the GIA in 2010, to running Instructor on its DiaMension HD platforms.