Archive

  • The Natural Color Diamond Association (NCDIA) will launch a U.K. chapter in London to facilitate networking among members of the trade and increase the public’s awareness about colored stones, writes Rapaport News. “Whilst the public is increasingly knowledgeable about white diamonds, there is still a lack of reliable information about natural-color diamonds,” the NCDIA said. “The NCDIA seeks to address this by disseminating the most up-to-date gemological information to their members and supplying them with trustworthy marketing and promotional tools.” The first U.K.

  • After nearly a decade of commitment and service to the association, Gino Di Geso will be transiting out of his role as Executive Director of the Natural Color Diamond Association later this month. Di Geso is joining L.J. West Diamonds as director of marketing, said a statement from NCDIA president Jordan Fine. "Gino started with the NCDIA in February 2006, and has served two executive directors, and several boards. The growth of the association is by-and-large a testament to his devotion, hard work and creativeness.

  • The Natural Color Diamond Association (NCDIA) has begun a series of conferences around the world aimed at increasing consumer awareness about diamonds. The events began in New York on October 2 before moving to Mumbai on October 8. They will cover the topics of rarity and value and natural pink diamonds and will continue with a conference at the Israel Diamond Institute in Ramat Gan next month. Further meetings are planned for Australia, London, Hong Kong and Antwerp, and subjects that will be discussed include natural versus synthetic diamonds and retailing with color.

  • Wholesalers at the Natural Color Diamond Association (NCDIA) seminar in NYC expected to learn whether Zimbabwe green diamonds with Kimberley Process (KP) certification are legal to trade. Instead, they learned that U.S. sanctions against the country made all diamonds from Zimbabwe off limits whether KP certified or not. In 2003, sanctions effectively stopped diamond trading between Zimbabwe, the EU and the US.