Diamond Trade 'Needs KP-Type Coalition To Explain The Good That Diamonds Do'

Sustainability
31/03/2016 08:51

"Very few speak of the good diamonds have done for some of the poorest people in the world," write Mark Boston and Vinod Kuriyan in a blog article on GemKonnect. "Of the positive influence on communities in literally every single continent barring uninhabited Antarctica." With the world's attention grabbed by evils such as terrorists, people traffickers, sex slavers, and drug cartels that destroy millions of lives, good deeds don’t get the sort of publicity that evil does. "It takes concerted action to get people to realize and acknowledge the good that has come out of some action or initiative. The diamond industry, unfortunately, hasn’t taken the kind of global concerted action needed to publicize the fact that it took proactive steps to tackle the scourge of blood diamonds, set up an industry supply chain audit system — the Kimberley Process — in concert with governments around the world and continues to work towards bringing education, healthcare and a host of other social benefits to stake-holding communities all around the world."

The diamond industry needs to find a way to inform the public since today’s consumers have a huge number of choices in spending their disposable income. "A bad reputation could destroy the diamond industry altogether." The diamond trade needs to show that it is environmentally caring and not simply interested in making a profit. It must move quickly but also recognize that it cannot do this alone. "It needs to co-opt governments and civil society organizations, much the same way as the Kimberley Process has done, to form a global coalition that has complete credibility. Credibility is vital and it is essential that the industry have credible partners in this Endeavour to correct public perception. We are not going to be believed otherwise." The Diamond Producers Association cannot persuade a skeptical public to believe that diamonds do good, so the message needs the support of both governments and civil society, the writers state.