Archive

  • On the back of a fourth-quarter push in diamond production that increased 58% year-on-year and 21% compared to Q3 2017, Rio Tinto ended the year 2017 with a 20% rise in rough diamond production to 21.63 million carats from 17.95 million carats in 2016. In Q4 alone, Rio Tinto unearthed 7.21 million of those 21.63 million carats, a tremendous increase over the 4.57 million carats extracted in the same period a year earlier.

  • Botswana’s Okavango Diamond Company (ODC) posted a 4 percent jump in sales to $567 million in 2017, reports Reuters, making this year's sales the highest annual sales since its formation in 2013, the company said on Thursday. The state-owned company sold 3.41 million carats of diamonds in 2017, managing director Marcus ter Haar told Reuters, adding that the year was characterised by healthy demand and prices in the first half, weakening from July through to November. The company says it generally has total sales in the region of $500 million annually. 

  • Zimbabwe is planning to resume auction of diamonds next month, having suspended sales in February last year following the merger in 2016 of companies previously operating in the Chiadzwa area of Marange, Manicaland province, reports Zimbabwe news outlet The Herald. Seven diamond miners operating in the country's Marange diamond fields were merged to form the Zimbabwe Consolidated Diamond Company (ZCDC), with the government having a 51% majority share. Dr.

  • According to preliminary figures released today, ALROSA’s rough and polished diamond sales for the year 2017 amounted to US$4.27 billion, a 5% decline from the US$4.49 billion in overall sales in 2016 despite an estimated 5% increase in rough diamond production. The Russian mining giant provisionally sold $4.17 billion in rough diamonds compared to $4.34 billion in 2016. They sold US$96.9 million in polished diamonds on the year.

  • Koin International will hold their January rough diamond tender in Antwerp from January 17 – 24 featuring multiple original rough mine productions from several African countries. The rough goods are from the following mining companies: Meya Mining (Sierra Leone), Diamcor (South Africa), Ekapa Minerals (Kimberley), ANGOLA F2M, Calendula (Angola), Texam (Guinea) and Kananga (DRC). The tender will also feature a selection of exceptional fancy yellow and pink diamonds. Viewings are by appointment only and can be scheduled through the link to the original article.

  • Russian diamond mining giant ALROSA has formed a list of long-term clients for the new contract period 2018-2020. From January 15 to January 19, 2018, the Company’s long-term clients will participate in the first trading session under the new long-term contract. Long-term contracts form the basis of ALROSA sales policy, accounting for up to 70% of sales of the diamonds the company mines. The contracts guarantee volumes and assortment of monthly supplies, as well as the possibility to purchase additional batches of rough diamonds.

  • Antwerp's vibrant rough diamond tender program gets rolling this week as Laurelton Diamonds Belgium will be holding the viewings of its next tender of rough and sawn at the Antwerp Diamond Tender Facility [ATF] in the AWDC Building in Belgium, starting January 9 and running through January 18. The tender will include a selection of white, cape rough parcels in sizes from +5cts to -7 in regular and high-quality assortments.

  • Gem Diamonds has announced the recovery of high-quality 117 and 110-carat, D colour Type IIa diamonds from the Letšeng mine in Lesotho, famed for its large, Type IIa stones that often achieve the highest dollar per carat rough prices in the world. The London-based company recovered seven such stones in 2017 after unearthing only five in 2016. 

    At their summer tender in 2017, Gem Diamonds achieved an average price of $2,397 per carat, making it the highest achieved dollar value per carat for a tender since September 2015. 

  • Australia's Lucapa Diamond Co. and its Angolan partners, Endiama and Rosas & Petalas, have decided to schedule the next diamond sale for early 2018. The timing of this sale is designed to maximise sale proceeds by selling into a usually stronger demand period at the beginning of the year. The next sale parcel of alluvial diamonds from the Lulo Diamond Project in Angola will total 2,160 carats. This includes the exceptional 129 carat and 78 carat Type IIa D-colour Lulo diamonds recovered from Mining Block 6 in November 2017.

  • In a recent meeting concerning the 2018 budget, Russian diamond mining giant ALROSA said diamond production is planned at 36.6 million carats in 2018, representing an approximately 7% decline from the 39.3 million carats it is likely to produce this year.

  • Independent analyst and consultant on diamonds and the mining industry, and publisher of the Zimnisky Global Rough Diamond Price Index, Paul Zimnisky has published a wide-ranging article comprised of quick diamond-industry stats and trends: "2018 Global Diamond Industry Primer". Here he lays out the current situation and developments as we bring the 2017 diamond year to a close, and identifies what to look out for in the year ahead.

  • The world's largest diamond producer by output, ALROSA, recovered of a large gem-quality diamond of 98.63 carats from its historic Jubilee (Yubileynaya) pipe, located in the eastern Republic of Yakutia. The octahedron crystal has inclusions of olivine, graphite and sulphide, is transparent yellow-tinted and measures 28.96 х 28.03 х 27.30 mm. "One more discovery weighing almost 100 carats confirms the fact that Jubilee pipe today is ALROSA's absolute leader in the recovery of large gem-quality diamonds.

  • De Beers reports the value of its provisional sales for Cycle 10 2017 (representing sales as at 11 December 2017) at $450 million, a modest drop from actual sales of $466 million in Cycle 9 and a nearly 7 percent increase from the $422 million in sales for the same cycle in 2016. It should be noted that De Beer’s provisional sales value for Cycle 9 was $455 million, later adjusted upward to $466M. For the year to date, De Beers has sold $5.306 billion in rough diamonds (noting the provisional nature of Cycle 10), compared to $5.587 billion in sales last year, a 5 percent decline.

  • Bain & Company, together with the Antwerp World Diamond Centre (AWDC), has published their seventh annual report on the global diamond industry, "The enduring story in a changing world", covering industry developments in 2016 and the first half of 2017 as well as the challenges the industry faces and how it is turning them into opportunities. Their report looks at key issues along the value chain, from rough-diamond production and sales, to midstream performance and global diamond jewelry demand in major markets.

  • De Beers Group has announced that its Auction Sales business is to transition Fixed-Price Forward Contracts to core business status, following the success of the pilot program that was launched in January 2017. Fixed-Price Forward Contracts offer the opportunity for Auction Sales customers to secure guaranteed access to bespoke future supply contracts, with certainty over the price to be paid when each contract reaches maturity.

  • In November 2017, ALROSA Group sold US$334.2 million worth of rough and polished diamonds. Rough diamond sales by value amounted to US$325.8 million, while polished diamond sales earned US$8.4 million during the month. This follows a month in which the Russian miner sold $326.7 million in rough stones, and represents a 36% increase compared to rough diamond sales in November 2016. Polished sales declined slightly from the $9.6 million in polished diamond sales in the same period last year.

  • According to figures released by the Antwerp World Diamond Centre, the Antwerp diamond trade experienced an increase in activity nearly across the board in November comparatively, likely tied to events in India and U.A.E. The volume of rough diamond exports surged by 107% compared to October and 142% year-on-year, reaching 14.6 million carats during the month. The value of those rough exports also spiked by 55% compared to last month and 22% year-on-year, achieving $1.28 billion.

  • The 709-carat "Peace Diamond", considered the 14th-largest rough diamond in history and recovered by artisanal miners in Sierra Leone’s Kono district in March, sold at Rapaport's auction in New York for $6.5 million, approximately $1.2M less than was originally offered for the stone. This despite - or perhaps because of - its tour through the major diamond trading centers. Renowned jeweler Laurence Graff was the buyer. Martin Rapaport, surrounded by Sierra Leonean officials at their press conference in New York, apologized that his efforts did not yield what they had hoped.

  • Firestone Diamonds commenced production at the Liqhobong diamond mine in Lesotho in October 2016, developing the new mine on time and under budget and hitting its early operational targets; however, lower than expected diamond prices achieved have forced the young miner to revise their plan. They held their first sale in Antwerp in February 2017, and on 30 June 2017 achieved commercial production. In late September, they reported they have sold all 505,706 carats recovered, for US$41.3 million, at an average value of US$82/ct.

  • DDA Trading Bvba has announced its fourth sale of Namibian Marine rough diamonds. DDA will be offering approximately 22,000 carats of full run-of-mine, original marine goods of gem quality. Viewings will take place by appointment in Antwerp at DDA Trading’s office in the Antwerp Diamond Bank from November 28 to December 6 with the sale closing on Wednesday 6. 

    Check out the entire December schedule of rough diamond tenders in Antwerp here.

  • India's Diwali holiday season was not so festive for the diamond trade, as the recess for the sector led to sharp declines in exports and imports in the month of October. According to statistics published by the Gem and Jewellery Export Promotion Council (GJEPC), exports of polished diamonds fell 23% in value to $1.93 billion, while declining 17% in volume, from 3.3 to 2.7 million carats year-over-year. For the year to date, the value of polished diamond exports has fallen 2.76% to $13.83 billion.
  • Gem Diamonds announced the recovery of a high-quality 202-carat, D color Type IIa diamond from the Letšeng mine in Lesotho. It is the seventh diamond of over 100 carats to be recovered to date in 2017 from Letšeng. In 2016, Gem Diamonds unearthed just five diamonds larger than 100 carats.
     
  • Mountain Province Diamonds, a 49% participant with De Beers Canada in the Gahcho Kué diamond mine located in Canada’s Northwest Territories, earned $19 million from their ninth tender of rough diamonds in Antwerp. It was the lowest haul in terms of overall value since their fourth sale of the year in May, but prices remained stable to firm, generally averaging about 2% higher than the eighth sale across the full assortment profile.

  • Lucapa Diamond Company and its partners, Endiama and Rosas & Petalas, have completed their eighth sale in 2017 of alluvial diamonds from the Lulo Diamond Project in Angola, earning gross proceeds of US$7.3 million (A$9.6 million), representing an average price per carat of US$1,770 (A$2,332) from 4,126 carats. The latest sale brought gross proceeds from Lulo diamond sales to date in 2017 to US$31.6 million at an average price per carat of US$1,668. 

  • Following the unearthing of the 476.7-carat diamond, dubbed the Meya Prosperity, at the Meya deposit in the Kono District of Sierra Leone, Meya Mining announced the appointment of Koin International as the marketing and sales agent for the exceptional diamond.

  • Anglo American’s De Beers’ rough diamond sales for the 9th cycle saw a 21% increase from the previous cycle, which CEO Bruce Cleaver says is due to “an uptick in demand from our customers as retail orders increase ahead of the Christmas season.”

  • Miners in Sierra Leone have unearthed a 476.7-carat diamond, reports the country's National Minerals Agency. Mining company Meya, owned by Namibia's Trustco Resources (51%) and Germinate Sierra Leone Ltd., discovered the stone in the diamond-rich eastern district of Kono.

  • Russian diamond-mining giant ALROSA's rough diamond sales figures in October totaled $326.7 million, which represents a $20 million increase over September but still lags far behind the $430.8 million sold in October 2016. Including polished diamond sales, good for $10.9 million in October, overall revenue for the month was $337.6 million.

  • ALROSA today announced the recovery of several large rough diamonds from Jubilee (Yubileynaya) pipe at Aikhal Mining and Processing Division in October.

  • Production from the Grib diamond mine, the source of the stones sold in Antwerp by Grib Diamonds, is expected to reach 4.4 million carats in 2017, representing a 16% increase over the 3.8 million carats last year. This is according to Alexey Genkin, general manager of Grib Diamonds in Antwerp, who informed Rapaport News of the increase during a recent visit to the Israel Diamond Exchange. "The plan is to raise production to 4.9 million carats in 2018, he said in the interview", and indicated that sales should increase in parallel with production.

  • The Antwerp diamond industry had a solid month of trading in October, particularly on the export side, as the value of rough and polished exports both took a turn for the better despite soft midstream demand for rough and a seasonally slow polished landscape. Furthermore, according to figures published by the AWDC, the trend of high volumes of low-value rough exports abated for the first time in months, as the increase in the value of rough exports (+15%) nearly kept pace with the increase in volume (+19%) on a year-over-year basis.

  • ALROSA held an international auction for the sale of special size rough diamonds (+10.8 carats) in the Eurasian Diamond Centre in Vladivostok from October 16 to 27. The company sold 66 stones with the total weight of 1,084 carats, out of a previously-announced 72 gem-quality lots with the total weight of 1,170 carats. The total sales revenue amounted to $9 million.

  • Russia mining giant ALROSA recently confirmed the company’s Sales Policy Concept for 2018-2020 as the new contract period approaches; long-term contracts for the sale of rough diamonds with large trading, cutting and jewelry companies for up to three years will remain the cornerstone of ALROSA’s sales, though some changes have been introduced. Namely, ALROSA is planning to switch over to annual mutual approval of the volume and assortment within three-year contracts.

  • DDA Trading, part of the DDA Group, has announced its third sale of Namibian Marine rough diamonds, which can be viewed in Antwerp from Monday the 6th to Tuesday the 14th of November. The sale will close on Tuesday, 14 November. DDA Trading will be offering approximately 15,000 cts of full ROM, Original Marine Goods of gem quality. The goods are from the underwater concessions of Samicor.

  • According to a De Beers spokesperson, the diamond miner is set to bring the Damtshaa Mine in Botswana - closed since 2015 - back into operation during the fourth quarter, reports Rapaport News. Opened in 2003, Damtshaa Mine was placed into care and maintenance in December 2015. De Beers is now set to recommision the mine and expects to be back at full production by January. Just over 300,000 carats were recoverd there during its last full year of operation in 2014, making it one of De Beers smaller mines, and more than 31 million have been produced since the mine opened.

  • It appears that Indian resources conglomerates Vedanta (controlled by London-based Indian billionaire Anil Agarwal) and Adani (controlled by fellow billionaire Gautam Adani) are considering bidding for a $9 billion diamond project in the country that was abandoned by Rio Tinto this year, reports Reuters. The central state of Madhya Pradesh was likely to invite bids in the first week of November to explore the deposit, which is estimated to have 32-34 million carats of diamond reserves, a senior state government official said. “We’re advertising only for that area in which (Rio Tint

  • According to Rapaport News, based on figures from the Ministry of Economy and Industry, Israel's diamond trade as a whole has slowed in 2017, as exports of polished diamonds to the US, Israel’s largest market, declined 15% to $1.26 billion during the nine-month period. Exports to Hong Kong are also down, but only by 3% to $1.01 billion. Rapaport writes: "The country’s exports of polished diamonds fell 12% year on year to $3.38 billion during the first nine months of 2017, while the volume of goods sent out dropped 11% to 1.297 million carats.

  • Koin International will hold a rough diamond tender in Antwerp from 7-16 November, featuring a wide variety of African goods. They will present an enlarged original production of Meya Minings (Sierra Leone) as well as, for the first time, the original Allotropes Run of Mine (Sierra Leone).

  • India's exports of cut and polished diamonds gained nearly 6% in value year-over-year in September, reports the Gem and Jewellery Export Promotion Council (GJEPC). The Indian trade exported $2.65 billion worth of polished diamonds in September 2017 compared to $1.82 billion in the same month a year earlier, according to provisional data. For the first half of the financial year to date (April-September), India's polished exports are up by 1.7% in value terms, currently sitting at $11.9 billion, compared to $11.7 billion a year earlier.