Archive

  • Israeli diamond tech group Sarine Technologies is opening its first gemological laboratory this February in Ramat Gan, Israel, with plans to follow with the opening of a lab in India, planned for May. The company says it will utilize its, "breakthrough artificial-intelligence based technological solutions for the automated, accurate, consistent, digital, and objective grading of a polished diamond's Clarity and Colour." The services offered will include authentication whether a polished diamond is a simulant, natural or synthetic, treated or not, as well as the grading of its 4Cs.

  • World-renowned diamond grading lab GIA has announced it will open a new laboratory in Surat, India and expand its long-term presence in Antwerp, Belgium in the second quarter of 2018 to meet the needs of the global gem and jewelry industry. GIA says it has already secured premises for both locations. In Antwerp, GIA will be occupying space in the Antwerp Diamond Bourse.

  • Since 2012, CVD synthetic diamonds have been tested and identified by National Gemstone Testing Center (NGTC) in Beijing, typically in sizes above 0.20 ct.  Since 2015, a large number of melee-size colorless and near-colorless synthetic diamonds have been detected in daily screenings at NGTC labs.

  • HRD Antwerp today launched its new diamond ID CARD: a highly affordable grading report for diamonds that weigh between 0.08 and 0.998 carats. "With this new product, we aim to bring a comprehensive solution to one of the diamond market’s main current challenges: ensuring confidence in small-sized diamonds," says Michel Janssens, CEO of HRD Antwerp.

  • The International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR), part of De Beers Group, today announced it will provide diamond verification services to Singapore Diamond Mint Company’s (SDM) new investment-grade diamond product, Diamond Bullion, listed on the Singapore Diamond Investment Exchange (SDiX).

  • Last week HRD Antwerp, a leading diamond grading and certification lab, detected two stones fashioned to imitate rough diamonds in an apparent attempt to fool a trader. This following a similar discovery of two large topaz crystals, fashioned as rough imitators, in July. The two rough stones were submitted to the lab, and in this case the stones “felt” like rough diamonds, however the density measurement identified the imitations as moissanite.

  • Last week, a leading diamond grading and certification lab HRD Antwerp detected two large topaz stones fashioned to imitate rough diamonds in an apparent attempt to fool a trader. "Two large, near-colourless rough stones weighing 50.08 and 38.18 ct were submitted to our research department to determine their quality," HRD's statement reads. "The results indicated that the gemstones, believed to be diamonds, were actually topaz.

  • The International Gemological Institute (IGI) will unveil two new organizations at a jewelry workshop in Italy this week on the technical and commercial impact of synthetic diamonds on the jewelry industry. Firstly, the IGI Italy Association, which will represent the Antwerp-based laboratory’s operations in Italy, combines the five territorial districts involved in implementing IGI’s School of Gemology programs in Italy. Secondly, the IGI Italy Alumni Association will also be introduced at the workshop.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has made an alarming discovery, namely, a natural white diamond covered by a thin (80 microns, or 0.003 inches) synthetic layer that colors it blue – and has warned that more such composites might be on the market. The 0.33-carat stone is a composite of CVD synthetic Type IIb diamond overgrowth on a natural Type Ia diamond.

  • The International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR), part of De Beers Group, today announced the launch of a world-first Synthetic Diamond Detection training course. It is the first in a series of education services to be rolled out during 2017, according to a press release. The two-day lab-based course will be unveiled in the U.S. towards the end of the JCK Jewelry show in Las Vegas on 8 and 9 June, and in India at the IIDGR Facility in Surat on 15 and 16 May.

  • The International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR), part of The De Beers Group of Companies, announced its first retail partnership in Asia for its generic polished diamond grading services. The partnership is with the Soo Kee Group in Singapore, which formally launches in February for the retailer’s bridal brand, Love & Co., for its Lovemarque diamond collection.

  • The International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR), part of The De Beers Group of Companies, has appointed independent digital agency Ridgeway to produce a new online education experience to share and disseminate the company’s industry knowledge to interested parties, reports Professional Jeweler. Ridgeway will develop an e-learning hub to provide educational courses on various topics. The plans will be unveiled at a launch event in April 2017, with the intention to have 1,000 students by the middle of 2018.

  • The International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR), part of The De Beers Group of Companies, has unveiled a US$5 million expansion of its diamond grading and testing centre in Surat, India. The move follows the Group’s initial investment of US$10 million in 2015 to establish the facility, which has the capacity to process over US$500 million of diamonds every year.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) on December 5 published the following press release: Following a five-month pilot program which started in June 2016, clients are now able to submit round D-to-Z melee-size diamonds through their fully automated GIA Melee Analysis Service.

  • HRD Antwerp has announced in a press statement that Peter Macken has been relieved of his duties as CEO as a result of differing strategic views. The decision was taken by mutual agreement and is effective immediately. HRD Antwerp’s Executive Committee thanked Mr. Macken for his services and wishes him all the best in his future endeavors and professional career. At the request of the HRD Antwerp Board of Directors, Mr. Ari Epstein, a statutory board member at HRD Antwerp and CEO of the Antwerp World Diamond Centre, has been appointed President of the HRD Antwerp Board of Directors.

  • HRD Antwerp has found grading discrepancies at the HRD Antwerp in Mumbai lab involving a limited number of diamonds which were submitted by one specific client. HRD Antwerp said in a statement that it maintains a continuous and rigorous system of internal controls. "As HRD Antwerp is adamant in upholding its excellent reputation in terms of quality, integrity and controls, the company has taken immediate and swift action. HRD Antwerp has filed an official complaint with the local authorities and legal action against all parties involved, both internally and externally, has been taken.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) is joining diamond miners such as De Beers and Alrosa in investigating the possibility of tracking the origin of diamonds, JCK's Rob Bates reports. "The GIA has confirmed talk that chief laboratory and research officer Tom Moses discussed a diamond origin tracking service at the recent JCK show in Las Vegas. While GIA offers origin reports for some colored stones, this would potentially involve tracking a diamond’s movements," he writes.

  • The GIA has developed a fully automated system which it says can rapidly and accurately analyze and sort round D-to-Z melee-size diamonds. The system was developed in response to concerns in the gem and jewelry industry about the possibility of synthetic or treated diamonds being mixed into parcels of melee. The pilot for the GIA's Melee Analysis Service will be carried out next month at GIA’s laboratory in New York. The service will be offered at all GIA locations, with the roll out beginning in the third quarter of this year.

  • HRD Antwerp, Europe’s leading diamond certification authority, has inaugurated its new Mumbai office extension and launched a new melee diamond screening service. At the center of this service is M-Screen, the world's fastest automated melee screening device that screens round brilliant diamonds from 1 point to 20 points for potential lab grown diamonds, potential HPHT colour enhanced diamonds and simulants. The M-Screen automatically feeds, screens and sorts out round brilliant diamonds at a speed of minimum two diamonds per second (7,200 diamonds per hour).

  • HRD Antwerp Hong Kong has opened its new office in Kowloon, sharing the same premises as the Hong Kong Indian Diamond Association (HKIDA).

  • A major article in India's Economic Times describes the developing battle lines between natural, mined diamonds and their lab-grown counterparts. The Bharat Diamond Bourse (BDB) in Mumbai, home to around 2,500 diamond companies and one of the world's largest exchanges, decided last September to act against traders and manufacturers who dealt in lab-grown diamonds. The outlawed trading in lab-grown stones due to increasing instances of such diamonds being added into parcels of natural mined goods.

  • The International Grown Diamond Association (IGDA) was launched last month, and industry analyst Chaim Even-Zohar quickly revealed flaws in its structure as well as major transgressions against accepted nomenclature, according to a blog on GemKonnect. In addition, the IGDA doesn’t seem to have done anything about the hugely important issue of the undisclosed mixing of lab-grown diamonds with parcels of natural stones. And the recently revealed scandal of CVD-created diamonds being sold with GIA grading reports has done little to calm nerves.

  • The significance of the announcement of the entry of the latest diamond grading lab to the industry, De Beers' International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR), is discussed by JCK's Rob Bates. The IIDGR previously mostly issued reports for De Beers’ Forevermark brand diamonds. The uniqueness of the new lab different is that it relies heavily on technology for grading, De Beers spokesperson David Johnson tells Bates. It uses automated devices for all color grading from VS to I3, and is used as a “grader aider” for higher grades, Johnson explained.

  • De Beers Group's International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research (IIDGR) has launched its grading service in the Far East, Middle East, India and Europe, the firm said. Following an initial pilot testing of the service in the Far East, IIDGR will now also provide a grading service from each of its laboratories in Belgium, India and the UK. The service, which employs De Beers’ proprietary grading technology to provide outstanding accuracy and consistency, is suitable for all sizes, colors, shapes and qualities.

  • "The Government of India should set up a regulatory authority to monitor the gemological laboratory business in India. The gemological laboratories issue only grading reports and no certificates. These laboratories have their own set of rules and regulations and even if consumers are cheated they have limited or no role to play. If a consumer has purchased a lab-grown diamond on natural diamond grading report, where will he go on being cheated? Who is responsible?

  • The American Gem Trade Association (AGTA) announced that it has amended its Code of Ethics and Principles of Fair Business Practice and presented recommended Source Disclosure language to the AGTA's strict Code of Ethics document. "For thirty five years, AGTA's Code of Ethics has served as a model for the entire industry", said AGTA CEO Douglas Hucker, and as a living document is was necessary and appropriate for us to amend them to strengthen our commitment to due diligence in the marketplace and to reflect our leadership role in the global efforts in supply chain integrity."

  • The vast majority of British jewelry buyers want to receive an independent grading report when buying a diamond, yet only 42% actually receive one, according to a study by De Beers' International Institute of Diamond Grading & Research. The study into attitudes towards diamond grading reports in the UK market reveals a huge “gulf” between what customers want and market reality. Most respondents said they strongly believed that grading reports raise confidence in a sale and the value of the diamond, however only around half of those that wanted one when buying a diamond received it.

  • The Gemmological Association of Great Britain (Gem-A) is looking for a new chief executive. The current interim CEO, Nick Jones, was taken on by the Gem-A council last October to steer the organization through the fourth quarter and to guide the recruitment process for a permanent chief executive the departure of James Riley, who was suspended in June 2015.

  • The GIA has extended the submission date for the confirmation service announced on November 25 to March 31 in response to concerns expressed by members of the trade. Anyone with a GIA grading report originally issued between November 2014 and October 2015 who is concerned about the validity of the report due to the unauthorized changes to grading reports uncovered in October 2015 may submit the original report and the referenced diamond to any GIA location for the confirmation service at no charge until the March 31 deadline for submissions, the GIA said in a statement.

  • Botswana’s Minister of Minerals, Energy and Water Resources Kitso Mokaila and GIA President and CEO Susan Jacques officially opened the GIA’s expanded lab and education facility in Gaborone. “Botswana plays a significant role in the diamond industry as one of the largest producing countries – both by value and volume,” said Jacques.

  • De Beers' Element Six Technologies Ltd subsidiary has today (Tuesday) begun legal action in Singapore against IIa Technologies Pte. Ltd alleging infringement of its patents concerning synthetic diamond material. Element Six believes that certain of its patents for proprietary synthetic diamond products and their method of manufacture have been infringed and the legal action aims to defend its intellectual property rights and business interests, the miner said in a statement. IIa Technologies claims to run the world's largest diamond-growing facility.

  • The Swiss Gemmological Institute SSEF has announced the release for international export of an upgraded version of its Automated Spectral Diamond Inspection (ASDI) device. The system is designed to support the diamond industry against the threat of small synthetic diamonds mixed into parcels of natural colourless melée diamonds.

  • HRD Antwerp CEO Peter Macken speaks about the work of the Antwerp lab and the services it offers, as well as some of the issues affecting the diamond industry. Macken states that, "As consumer demand for diamonds is forecasted to grow in the years ahead, undisclosed synthetic diamonds entering the market remains a challenge for traders and consumers alike. It therefore is very important that all lab-grown diamonds can be identified by a professional lab. It is the diamond industry’s responsibility to ensure the consumer is never misled. We at HRD Antwerp take this task to heart."

  • The FEEG said it is launching the new website in a bid to raise knowledge of its qualification and to enhance cooperation between centers across Europe.

  • A court battle between EGL USA and the global European Gemological Laboratory network that has lasted for 11 years has ended with both sides losing, according to a report in JCK. The court case began in 2004 with the European Gemological Laboratory network and EGL founder Guy Margel, who died in 2012, filing suit against EGL USA in February 2004, claiming breach of contract related to royalties stemming from the two sides’ 1986 licensing agreement.

  • The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) will be holding seminars at the Israel Diamond Exchange next week aimed at improving understanding and knowledge about treatments and synthetics. The speakers at the seminars will be Dr. James Shigley and Brenda Harwick.

  • The Swiss-based Gübelin Gem Lab and Swiss Gemmological Institute SSEF have agreed to harmonize their standards for the color terms “pigeon blood red” and “royal blue.” Their goal is to standardize the usage of these terms for the benefit of the international gemstone trade. The terms have become increasingly popular in recent years as some labs use them in their marketing of grading reports, but agreement on the precise colors has been difficult to achieve since they are considered to be highly subjective.

  • HRD Antwerp recently examined a 3.09-carat CVD lab-grown diamond. It was the first time that a CVD synthetic diamond of such a size was seen at the lab. CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) is a technique where diamonds are grown in a specially developed growing chamber using a carbon rich gas.

  • The speakers include Navy Seal, Marcus Luttrell, whose story inspired the 2013 Oscar-nominated movie, “Lone Survivor,” and  motivational speaker Joel Zeff, known for his interactive exercises using audience participation. The Conclave is due to take place at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, outside Washington, D.C., from April 13 to 16.

  • British company Bowers & Wilkins is using synthetic diamonds to create tweeters, saying they are ideal for producing high audio frequencies. It is the first time diamonds have been used for the purpose in a commercial car, with the speakers being created for the latest BMW 7 Series. The lab-grown stones offer the perfect combination of lightness and rigidity to help deliver crystal-clear, lifelike treble sounds that are designed to accurately reproduce audio beyond the limits of human hearing.